Read Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson Bryan Collier Online

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Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us, Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us.Written by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 to celebrate Abraham Lincoln's birthday, "Lift Every Voice and Sing" has become an anthem for African Americans in the struggle for equality.Bryan Collier's vibrant, stunning artwork offers an inspirational andSing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us, Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us.Written by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 to celebrate Abraham Lincoln's birthday, "Lift Every Voice and Sing" has become an anthem for African Americans in the struggle for equality.Bryan Collier's vibrant, stunning artwork offers an inspirational and rousing interpretation of this powerful song that continues to influence and shape new generations of children today....

Title : Lift Every Voice and Sing
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780060541477
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 362 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Lift Every Voice and Sing Reviews

  • Rowena
    2018-12-06 04:42

    And to think I was going to pass on buying this book at my library booksale. I was inspired to read this poetry collection as Maya Angelou mentions one of the poems in her autobiography.The poems cover a relatively wide range of topics, from slavery to racism, love to death. Some poems use very shocking imagery and elicit visceral emotions, others are even slightly funny. Weldon Johnson's command of the English language was definitely on display, as well as were the poems he wrote in the "Negro dialect" (his own words.The poem's exhortating nature (encouraging the people to overcome racism, feelings of inadequacy etc.) is probably why people like Angelou especially loved this poet. I can tell these poems had an even bigger impact on African-Americans when they were written over 100 years ago but what I find to be more spectacular is how much power the words still hold. I'm definitely glad I own a copy, will be re-reading this in the future.

  • Ken Moten
    2018-11-17 22:38

    "Shadowed beneath thy handmay we forever standtrue to our God, true to our native land."This poem, this hymn, this anthem. I myself learned it in primary school as a boy. It was a hymn written originally as a poem to celebrate the birthday of Abraham Lincoln in 1900. It was later set to music by the author's brother and became a mainstay in segregated African-American schools (or in my case post-integrated/re-segregated mostly Black schools) for years. I confess that I knew this song many years before I knew (or cared to know) the Star-Spangled Banner. The lines of each verse are divided in a narrative form of 4(a)-2(b)-3(c). This song is so powerful and filled with meaning that I really feel it stands out, then and now, as a powerful anthem of perseverance through will and faith and I will now try to give my impressions of the anthem itself verse by verse. "Lift every voice and sing, till earth and heav'n ring,Ring with the harmonies of liberty;Let our rejoicing rise, high as the list’ning skies,Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,Let us march on till victory is won."This the (naturally) most known verse of the hymn, is sort of an ode liberty itself as the second line says. It asked for reflection on the troubles of years past (many families who sung this in 1900 would have still had living memories of slavery in America); It says to sing of the hope still in the present time and I notice that it is careful by using the word hope instead of assurance, or security, or freedom/equality. Then we are told to march on until we realize that hope even when it appears to be sunshine on the horizon. "Stony the road we trod, bitter the chastening rodfelt in the days when hope unborn had diedYet with a steady beat, have not our weary feetCome to the place for which our fathers sighed[?]We have come over a way that with tears has been wateredWe have come treading a path through the blood of the slaughteredOut of the gloomy past till now we stand at lastWhere the white gleam of our bright star is cast."This verse gets down to more serious business. The part in bold especially strikes me when I read it. What do you have to go through to know the loss of hope before it is born? and the next two lines ask "are we not still on the precipice of our immediate ancestors?" (I take this as a nod to the American Civil War, this was written to commemorate Lincoln.) The narrator (and us as by now we are all included in the narrative) recounts the struggle to freedom through a path of tears and blood. The ending lines here reassures us that we are nearly toward the goal we have and others have died for. "God of our weary years, God of our silent tearsThou who has brought us thus far on the wayThou who has by thy might led us into the lightKeep us forever on the path we prayLest our feet stray from the places oh god where we met theeLest our heart drunk with the wine of the world we forget theeShadowed beneath thy hand, may we forever standTrue to our God, true to our native land."This last verse is a direct appeal to God to forever keep "us" (audience and narrator) on the "path" of liberty. Lines 5-6 warns that if this does not happen we forget "thee" and more likely are mission for liberty/equality. And of course the last two lines that I quote at the beginning of the review also makes me think, the last phrase in particular. When Johnson writes "native land" is he talking about Africa, America, or wherever the audience is from? Is it even a place that he references or is it a concept. This "native land" could be equality, liberty, justice, enlightenment, etc. I just always liked the subtle ambiguity in that line. So as I have said before if the USA ever thought to replace the Star-Spangled Banner as our national anthem it wouldn't hurt to take a look at this anthem.

  • Liz Janet
    2018-12-04 03:22

    "Lift every voice and sing,Till earth and heaven ring,Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;Let our rejoicing riseHigh as the list’ning skies,Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,Let us march on till victory is won.Stony the road we trod,Bitter the chast’ning rod,Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;Yet with a steady beat,Have not our weary feetCome to the place for which our fathers sighed?We have come over a way that with tears has been watered.We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered,Out from the gloomy past,Till now we stand at lastWhere the white gleam of our bright star is cast.God of our weary years,God of our silent tears,Thou who hast brought us thus far on the way;Thou who hast by Thy might,Led us into the light,Keep us forever in the path, we pray.Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee,Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee;Shadowed beneath Thy hand,May we forever stand,True to our God,True to our native land."

  • Sydney
    2018-11-22 05:28

    This book has a really good marriage of picture and text. It depicts the difficulties the African American people faced in American history. It gives hope as these challengers were overcome and the text is a song of jubilee.

  • Matthew
    2018-12-08 00:27

    The lyrics to the famous song set down in an illustrated picture book. It's a nice tribute to the song. Also included at the end are the sheet music and a brief afterward describing the song's origins.

  • Jim
    2018-12-16 04:38

    This picture book and its back-story are interesting from several perspectives:Lift Every Voice and Sing was written by James Weldon Johnson and set to music by his brother, J. Rosamond Johnson, who had studied at the New England Conservatory of Music. It was written and composed for schoolchildren to sing at a celebration of Abraham Lincoln's birthday in 1900. At the time, both brothers were teachers in the (segregated) public school system in their hometown of Jacksonville, Florida, to which they had returned after college.I don’t know about the song’s current status, but for many years black people considered it as the Negro National Anthem.The strong, expressive linocuts chosen to illustrate this book come from a larger collection of linocuts created by the distinguished black artist Elizabeth Catlett from a Julius Rosenwald Foundation grant that she was awarded in the 1940s. It’s impressive how well her prints illustrate the words of the song, considering that they were created independently of the song.

  • Katie Hall
    2018-12-03 04:35

    Title: Lift every voice and singAuthor: Bryan CollierIllustrator: James Weldon JohnsonPublisher: Amistad PressDate: October 16, 2007Genre: PoetryI would use this book for a social studies unit plan. This poem would be awesome for adding children’s literature into the lesson. I also like that it is poetry, so it will be a smooth and easy read, and not overwhelming.

  • Sephire
    2018-12-16 04:30

    This is a great book! Its a spin on the song "Lift Every Voice". In this book it discusses the struggles African Americans experience during the Civil Rights movement. It is a great book to read during a Civil Rights Unit.

  • Miranda Middleton
    2018-12-10 03:20

    This book would fit perfectly in a 5th or 6th grade unit covering African American history, Slavery, and freedom. I like this book because it is a song and a declaration. The story of these people is told in a song rather than a traditional storyline, very unique.

  • Kanani
    2018-11-17 04:20

    This book contains relevant historical black and while photos to go with the lyrics of this powerful song. All of the photos are well done, and parents should prepare for a photo of a slave's scarred back. No bells or whistles, but excellent in a simple way.

  • Julie
    2018-12-10 23:36

    The illustrations were stunning. As I turned each page, I looked for the subtle silhouette of the child repeated in the landscape. While I viewed the illustrations, I pulled up the song and listened.

  • John
    2018-12-01 22:26

    Beautifully illustrated

  • Christine
    2018-11-29 21:37

    Didn't find the illustrations as compelling as I would expect from Bryan Collier.

  • Andreia
    2018-11-20 04:25

    The does such a great job bringing the words to life. ImpactfulI can truly read and look at this pictures over and over and over...and I have!

  • Kanani
    2018-11-19 23:42

    Beautifully illustrated version of "lift every voice and sing".

  • Lisa
    2018-11-28 01:47

    A pictorial on James Weldon and John Rosamond Johnson's 'Lift Every Voice and Sing'. Seemed hastily thrown together. Historical information regarding the making of the song is included.

  • Julie Unruh
    2018-12-02 21:19

    Very good and shows their history,