Read 1001 Classical Recordings You Must Hear Before You Die by Matthew Rye Online

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"1001 Classical Recordings" is a guide concerned with excellence in every field of classical music. The reader becomes familiar with the Gregorian chants of the Medieval age (pre-1400), the madrigals and more secular music of the Renaissance (1400-1600), the intricate ornamentation of the Baroque era (1600-1750), the structured pieces of the Classic period (1750-1820), and"1001 Classical Recordings" is a guide concerned with excellence in every field of classical music. The reader becomes familiar with the Gregorian chants of the Medieval age (pre-1400), the madrigals and more secular music of the Renaissance (1400-1600), the intricate ornamentation of the Baroque era (1600-1750), the structured pieces of the Classic period (1750-1820), and the emotionally charged Romantic works (1820-1900), right through to the innovative and sometimes challenging composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. From the great and inspiring Masses, choral works, symphonies, concertos, and operas, to the intimacies and subtleties of chamber music and pieces written for small ensembles and soloists, the reader builds up a full understanding of the variety of music in the classical genre, and is guided to the most outstanding recordings of each masterpiece. Each entry is potentially a gateway to exciting new territories of music for the reader to explore....

Title : 1001 Classical Recordings You Must Hear Before You Die
Author :
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ISBN : 9780789315830
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 960 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

1001 Classical Recordings You Must Hear Before You Die Reviews

  • Philippe
    2019-05-05 08:42

    This book is a valuable aid to deepening knowledge of the classical repertoire for both newbies and seasoned listeners. Richly illustrated, with countless high quality and rarely seen pictures of composers and performing artists, it is a browser's delight. The recordings are organised chronologically, grouped in stylistically homogeneous clusters corresponding to roughly 50-year time intervals. So while all of Mahler's major works are included in the book, you won't find them listed next to one another. Two indexes, one composer and another work-orientated respectively, greatly facilitate looking up specific works and recordings. The core of the classical repertoire is very well represented but there is much that will intrigue veteran collectors too. Given the British origin of most (if not all) contributors to this volume, there is, perhaps, a slight Anglo-Saxon bias to the selection. I find myself agreeing with many of the recommendations in this guide. That gives confidence in following the reviewers' leads to as yet unknown works. Each recording is accompanied by an accessible but relevant text providing details about composer, compositional process and the qualities of the selected recording. For a significant subset of works the lead recommendation is backed up by three additional recordings. I'm perusing the Dutch edition of this book which displays some amusing eccentricities in the translation (for instance, referring to Daniel Barenboim's Beirut production of the Wagner Ring). On the whole the translation is, however, decent enough.

  • Cat
    2019-05-02 09:25

    I'm a bit of an anthology fan, it has to be said. I'm lazy so anytime the leg work is taken out of something, I'm going to have a grand time and this book is no different. Beautifully put together with classical pieces ranging across several centuries, it's a great introduction to classical music for newcomers but it also serves as a great reminder of pieces that might have been forgotten by a more seasoned ear.

  • Hardisty
    2019-04-30 10:42

    Good range of selection, but looks like a big proportion of British composers/performers

  • Neil
    2019-04-25 02:25

    Here's a public confession. I'm the music buyer for my library, but my acumen with classical is limited. I have a few composers who I really love, others who bore me. So I depend on books like this to help me identify what works I need to buy and which renditions I should get. It took me forever, but working through this in combination with reviews on Amazon and other places, I worked through this book to great effect. I enjoyed the descriptions, was inspired to try many more composers, and appreciated that the book was consistently attractive.One caveat: several of the preferred performances in this book are not currently available, I would estimate about 25%, which isn't great for a work published two years ago. The entries that give a full page to a work, and include alternate renditions, are thus much more effective than the shorter entries. This is no substituting for a knowledge gained through years of listening, but it was a good step in furthering my education in classical music.

  • Ed
    2019-04-21 03:52

    A good summer browse book...basically to see which of the supposedly great recordings I may own or may have heard, and maybe to be turned on to ones I haven't.As the spectre of death looms ever nearer, I'm often reminded how important it is to make the most of fleeting time. I have no intention of hearing these 1001 recordings--does anyone, really? At my back I always hear time's winged chariot drawing near. So it's a place to start, a jumping off point...like "oh, that looks interesting" as the cold shiver from death's unseen hand traverses my spine. A requiem, a totentanz...how festive. Why do some of us always turn to what we know, reinforce the familiar, coddle ourselves in the comfortable...and then give ourselves a hearty slap-on-the-back when we make a mad dash barely out of the comfort zone? Human nature? Some are definitely more adventuresome than others. Whom does one trust? A list? A guidebook? A guidance counselor? A grief counselor?Is there no pity sitting in the cloudsThat sees into the bottom of my grief?(Romeo & Juliet)

  • Bill
    2019-05-18 02:41

    Subjective, of course, but not as infuriating as is usually the case (still, not even a mention of the Heifetz Brahms VC?, or any of Bach's Lute/Lute-Harpsichord works?), in fact to my tastes the best overall collection of recommendations I've seen. The book I'd recommend to someone starting a Library (or personal) classical collection, along with the Third Ear Classical Guide.

  • Chimezie Ogbuji
    2019-05-19 08:29

    This is a must have if you are building a collection of classical music or already have a collection you need a reference for. It lists the work in chronological order, describes the music, links the composer with contemporaries, organizes by kind of music (orchestral, vocal, opera, ballet, etc.), and includes a review of the best recording of each work.