Read David and the Phoenix by Edward Ormondroyd Joan Raysor Online

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With a tremendous surge of its wings, the Phoenix managed to seize a branch. David's legs slipped from the bird's back, and he dangled over the abyss. Thus ends the near-disaster of their first flight together. But don't underestimate the Phoenix! Failure only makes David's new-found friend determinded to get into shape so that David's education for Life can proceed. AndWith a tremendous surge of its wings, the Phoenix managed to seize a branch. David's legs slipped from the bird's back, and he dangled over the abyss. Thus ends the near-disaster of their first flight together. But don't underestimate the Phoenix! Failure only makes David's new-found friend determinded to get into shape so that David's education for Life can proceed. And get into shape the fabulous bird does just as they conclude their first successful (and very scary) adventure, the Scientist appears. Don't underestimate the Scientist, either. He is just as stubborn as the Phoenix, and is driven by one obsession: to become famous by capturing the mythic bird. And if his traps don't work, he is fully prepared to shoot the Phoenix......

Title : David and the Phoenix
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781930900134
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 173 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

David and the Phoenix Reviews

  • Erik Graff
    2019-03-09 10:12

    Other than Dr. Seuss' Cat in the Hat, this may have been the first book I ever read on my own. It left an indelible impression and would occasionally mentioned in conversations about reading and childhood over the years. Unlike the Seuss, it was what kids nowadays call "a chapter book"--no pictures except at the head of chapters.The plot, as I've recalled it over the years, is basically about a lonely little boy who moves to the country, and, having no alternatives and having natural curiosity, spends his time exploring hills, cinder cones (?), near his home. In one of them he meets and is befriended by a phoenix who becomes his teacher and substitute parent.The book ends with the phoenix, preparing to immolate himself as phoenixes do, telling David not to come again, that they must part forever. David cannot abide this and sneaks up the hill to see . . .At the time of reading I was six and had, a late-bloomer, just learned to read. My parents, who argued too much, had just moved to the unincorporated Kane County, Illinois. The identification with David was, therefore, probably inevitable.Aa couple of years ago I came upon a copy of the book at the Evanston library booksale. Skimming it, I was pleasantly surprised to find that my recollection of it was substantially accurate, though the book was a lot thinner than recalled. I bought it, gave it to my niece who also lives in the country with arguing parents.

  • Margo Berendsen
    2019-02-26 02:48

    This is one of my childhood favorites and now I'm reading it to my kids. My copy is seriously old - I think 1960's - and I was THRILLED to discover that it's not only on Goodreads, but there is a sort of small cult following for it!Do you know the difference between a gryffin, gryffon and a gryffen? Where sea monsters like to sleep? How a banshee can be quite helpful for repelling Scientists? How to out-race a witch on a new broomstick? This book is a treasure trove of little adventures, but the best part is the persnickety, vain, adorable lovable Phoenix. If you love mythical creatures, you absolutely must track down this little gem! I'm enjoying just as much as an adult as I did when I was a kid, and my kids clamor for the next chapter every night.

  • Ron
    2019-02-25 04:50

    You know, I think I've read this book before . . . a long, long time ago (though in the local galaxy).Even as a child's read-aloud book, it wouldn't be so highly rated today, but for a young reader struggling with sounding out the words the style and repetition is a great learning tool. The pomposity of the Phoenix was just enough for someone eight or so years old to get the joke and feel inside.This Gutenberg edition includes Joan Rayso's enjoyable pen-and-ink illustrations.A very good read for a young reader.

  • Erin
    2019-03-14 11:08

    I am so glad that "David and the Phoenix" has been republished because my family has fought over our tattered, yellow copy for years. It is a FANTASTIC book. Well-written fantasy. Wonderful imagery. Highly recommended.

  • Dolly
    2019-03-05 09:13

    This is a fun story, but I would warn parents that there are some questionable parts that may nor be appropriate for younger children. For example, the word 'stupid' is used several times, as is the reference to someone slitting another's throat. Also, funeral pyres are discussed, as well as electrocution. I would caution parents to be mindful of their child's maturity level before reading this book together. Still, our oldest daughter and I enjoyed the production, chuckling often at the silly pomposity of the phoenix and his insatiable desire for more cookies. We enjoyed listening to the audio CD with the full cast production and appreciated the adventures with mythological creatures that David and the phoenix experienced. I wasn't a big fan of the characterization of the 'evil' scientist, and I think that the good vs. bad drama was a bit heavy handed. Still, it was an entertaining story.

  • Liana
    2019-03-19 04:11

    This story is AMAZINGGGG!!!! What a hidden gem! How is this book not more well known? It's the best thing that I've read in a long while. To think that it's geared towards children... I say that this book is for the whole family to enjoy. It's loaded with adventure, humor, suspense, MYTHICAL CREATURES, and good fun.My favorite moment has to be when the town thought a burglar was going about every window...I had hoped for a more satisfying close to the story as it ended in a bad place, but this book was so much fun that I wasn't overly bother by it. Besides, a happy ending is a happy ending. (Though in this case, maybe sliiiiightly bittersweet.)

  • Beka
    2019-03-10 05:05

    A very enjoyable story, although the ending felt too abrupt for my tastes.

  • Carolin
    2019-03-02 09:59

    adorable. i see i neednt worry about what to give the children in my family for their birthdays this year.

  • KennyO
    2019-02-22 09:07

    Five stars because this book was my youthful introduction (via a young peoples book club) to the world of reading outside my parents urging and the classroom and it instilled an admiration for a good story that's told well. Because of David and the Phoenix I read widely diverse books and laid a foundation for getting in trouble in school for reading far beyond my grade level. "Vivo, vives, vive..."

  • Ivan
    2019-03-23 07:07

    Truly delightful and inspired fantasy adventure. I think that if I'd read this when I was nine or ten years old that it would have been my favorite book. There's a bit of the Peabody and Sherman relationship between David and the Phoenix (and I couldn't tell you which came first). The adventures are inspired. My favorite was the encounter with the faun - perhaps it's because I'm a great fan of Mr. Tumnus - who knows. The book was well written, good natured and entertaining throughout.

  • AnnaMarie
    2019-02-28 03:11

    It was ok. Cute, not much to it.

  • Susan
    2019-03-06 04:55

    I have memories of DAVID AND THE PHOENIX by Edward Ormondroyd from 1958 when it was a Weekly Reader Book Club edition. After I recently learned that the author had written more books, I decided I needed to re-read the book as it has stayed with me for so many years. I found that it has an almost cult following.Again, it did not disappoint. David, a young boy, has just moved to a new house where there is a mountain in the back yard. Eager to explore, he climbs the mountain and meets a majestic, mythical bird --a Phoenix. The bird is quite intelligent and learned if somewhat of a fussbudget.He takes David on several exiting and often humorous adventures to meet strange and wonderful creatures. However, there is a bad guy…. the Scientist who is intent on capturing or killing the magnificent Phoenix because it is so unique. While the ending is somewhat bittersweet, the book spurs the younger readers’ imagination. Reading this now as an adult, I can see much more symbolism and imagery than when I first read it. There is a lot of mythology that seems to be ignored today as well as many religious/Christian images that went over my head when I was eight.Very close to the end, I found the line “we cannot ignore the tradition, no matter what our feelings may be” and I knew why the book has always had such a hold on me. In fact, I think it shaped my thoughts on tradition growing up and has continued to influence me.

  • Inder
    2019-02-25 08:14

    This is a "classic" that I had never heard of until it was recommended by a lovely local indie bookstore employee. There are really only two characters- David and the Phoenix! - and the book chronicles their adventures. I read it to my kids aged almost 5 and 8. I really enjoyed it and found the plot and language delightful. My 4 year old seemed to have a bit of difficulty keeping up with it, but my 8 yo remained engaged throughout. I wouldn't say it captured his imagination the way My Father's Dragon did, but he was interested and enjoyed it! For my part, I really enjoyed it!

  • CM
    2019-03-25 04:17

    I have been trying to find the book of my grade school years that my teacher read to the class about the phoenix. I could only remember the ending when the phoenix came back to life. I'm not certain, but I think this is what I have been trying to recollect for nearly 50 years! It was a wonderful read and I am certainly glad to have spent another day under the spell of this delightful author!

  • Emile
    2019-02-23 08:11

    The tone is almost exactly like The Reluctant Dragon by Kenneth Grahame, but it's a good deal longer, and slightly more contemporary. It's hard for me to judge this with fresh eyes since it was a book a loved dearly as a child.

  • Michael Bennett
    2019-02-25 11:00

    First time reading this book and if I had kids I would surely read it to them too. I think it's a book that will fill kids with wonder and awe. I'm surprised it has not been made into a movie. What a great piece of work. It instantly became a classic for me.

  • Linda Smith
    2019-03-21 06:58

    I first read this book back in 1958 because my parents had enrolled me for a year in the Children's Book Club. I have lost count of the number of times I have read David and the Phoenix but, apparently, I am still young enough to enjoy it. The book opens as David and his family are moving into a new house. His backyard ends at a mountain. David has never seen a mountain before and is fascinated by the sight. It is only the first of many fascinating sights that this young boy will behold. Upon climbing the mountain, he literally stumbles into a phoenix who is reading a Spanish grammar book aloud. Due to the persistent presence of a scientist who is determined to capture or kill the mythical bird, the phoenix is preparing to relocate once again. However, David and the phoenix become friends and the creature is convinced to help complete the boy's education. They set out on a series of hilarious adventures and misadventures. Thank you Goodreads for reminding me that this is one of the books that I love to read over and over again. It had been a few years and I enjoyed it all over again.

  • Alexis
    2019-03-06 06:11

    Summary: After David and his family move to a new home in the country, David is left to explore his new, unchartered territory. While exploring the mountain near his home, David stumbles upon something he has never seen before: the mystical Phoenix! The Phoenix quickly realizes that he must teach David about the mystical being and truths about Life. He takes David through the mystical realms, in which they meet mythical beings. These include mythical beings such as banshees and trickester leprechauns. Along the journey, David must help the Phoenix elude from the terrible Scientist who has been after the Phoenix for years. The ending will leave you heart-broken, yet hopeful.Evaluation: I am in love with this book! From beginning to end, I remained engaged and excited to read this book. It was full of ups and downs, from the lonliness that comes from David to the adventures that the Phoenix takes David on. This book is great for most ages. It was an easy read and easy to follow for young readers.Teaching Idea: I would like to use this book to teach students about visualization. The book is full of details regarding the Phoenix and the many adventures that David and the Phoenix went on. I would assign students different passages and have students draw what they see when they read the passage.

  • Christy
    2019-03-20 05:50

    With a tremendous surge of its wings, the Phoenix managed to seize a branch. David's legs slipped from the bird's back, and he dangled over the abyss. Thus ends the near-disaster of their first flight together. But don't underestimate the Phoenix! Failure only makes David's new-found friend determinded to get into shape so that David's education for Life can proceed. And...more With a tremendous surge of its wings, the Phoenix managed to seize a branch. David's legs slipped from the bird's back, and he dangled over the abyss. Thus ends the near-disaster of their first flight together. But don't underestimate the Phoenix! Failure only makes David's new-found friend determinded to get into shape so that David's education for Life can proceed. And get into shape the fabulous bird does just as they conclude their first successful (and very scary) adventure, the Scientist appears. Don't underestimate the Scientist, either. He is just as stubborn as the Phoenix, and is driven by one obsession: to become famous by capturing the mythic bird. And if his traps don't work, he is fully prepared to shoot the Phoenix...

  • Aelvana
    2019-02-27 04:12

    David is thrilled to move into his new house, because he's got a mountain just beyond his backyard that begs to be explored. And the mountain has plenty of secrets---including one very extraordinary bird, the Phoenix! Summer vacation has seldom been more interesting.The short, simple story wastes no time getting right to the glory within: a legendary bird, an innocent young boy, and an unusual friendship for both. The Phoenix, with its near-500 years of knowledge and wisdom, pontificating personality, and amazing capability, is a stark contrast to the rather ordinary David. But David has his own share of ingenuity (particularly because the Phoenix, for all its virtues, hasn't a speck of humility, and often overlooks the easy answers).This is a light read, easily devoured, and my sole regret is that David didn't have twice the adventures. He gets to meet a variety of creatures, and none of them are typical, either. They all veer off from being a straight retelling of their myths somehow, from the shy Sea Monster to the Banshee that took up a career change late in life. I rate this book Highly Recommended.

  • Preston Lee
    2019-03-03 10:04

    Yes, I realize this is in the "childrens" category. And yes, I'm a 29-year-old male. But I do periodically like to venture out of my comfort zone in semi-random directions in hopes of stumbling upon little-known treasure.From purely an adult perspective, David and the Phoenix is a straightforward adventure story between a boy and a bird that is both a quick and easy read. I have to dock several points, unfortunately, as:(1) The Kindle 3G version, at least, does NOT contain the illustrations. Illustrations are a large part of the fun of fantasy adventure books like this, and whatever the issue is with Kindle illustrations needs to be rectified before any other Kindle owner should consider purchasing this title.(2) The Phoenix is kind of... a jerk, and I just didn't care for his boastfulness. I emoted no sense of pity nor empathy for his situation and never really cared about either of the main characters.Overall: 3 of 5

  • Elentarien
    2019-02-27 04:00

    Quite enjoyed this one. Read the 'Gutenberg' version on my Ereader. Its a child's book, so a very quick and easy read for an adult. The story is light and rather humourous. The Phoenix is a bit of a dope, but amusingly so. His boastfulness and pride more a cover, without overshadowing the child character. (Although for a creature of 500 years old, he doesn't seem to know much). They get into some amusing adventures and out again. My only 'real' complaint about the book is the VERY abrupt ending. It hits the climax, then just. . .stops. There is absolutely no wind-down or wrapping things up. You have no idea what happens to the boy - or if he gets into any sort of trouble afterwards. It just. . .cuts off. Over all, though, apart from the very ending, this was a fun, fanciful read. Even got a giggle out of me, which is rare. (The banshee wail just got me. The image of everyone being so spooked by the noise is really quite funny.)

  • Alison Levie
    2019-03-11 09:17

    This book was recommended to me by a student. David discovers a phoenix living on the mountain behind his new house. The phoenix takes him on a host of adventures to learn about other creatures (all of them mythical creatures like unicorns, a faun, a leprechaun). How will David get away from his family to pursue his adventures? Will the scientist who is tracking the bird manage to shoot his so he can study him? Where will the phoenix take David next? There's lots of suspense and a fair amount of humor. The ending, which is very satisfying to me, might be confusing to some children. They might need a little help interpreting it because it is subtle. The book was originally written in 1957 when children were free to roam and explore. The reading level might be S.

  • Cori
    2019-03-08 11:08

    So it might be sentimental from enjoying this book as a youth, but I just read it again and what can I say? It's dear to my heart. The Phoenix is a memorable, lovable character and David is an innocent, inquisitive young boy looking for adventure. I told my five-year-old daughter a few stories from within the book and she keeps asking for more. I will read it aloud to her someday soon. What's not to love about traveling to distant lands with a large, exotic, talking bird to meet mythical creatures, or scheming ways to scare off the evil scientist pursuing the Phoenix? I think this is the first time I've read the book when I haven't cried at the end...only because I've read it so many times. This is one I'm very happy to have on my own shelves.

  • Relyn
    2019-03-12 06:55

    My favorite book website is Loganberry Books. http://www.logan.com/harriett/default...She is a children's book expert with a vast knowledge of the genre. One of my favorite things she does is solve mysteries. Anyway, one day I was poking around and found this book listed in the most requested books section. People are passionate about this out of print book. If you doubt me, do a search on ABE and check out the prices. Libraries are a marvelous invention, though. Through inter-library loan, I checked this book out. It was delightful and as a child I would have been completely enamoured. Not worth the price tag it carries now, but definitely worth a read.

  • Josie
    2019-02-26 05:17

    This was one of my absolute favourite books as a kid. It hasn't been around the house for years but I have deeply fond memories of it, and remember a good deal of the detail - even the use of the word "debris" which I had never heard of before! I was always fascinated by the crazy, idiosyncratic creatures David and the phoenix visited, and the suspense of their secret adventures. The phoenix was ever-so-slightly annoying but a strong and interesting character, and the ending had a bittersweet kick that certainly made the book special and different to a kid who was mostly reading Enid Blyton at the time. I must track down another copy some day...

  • Terri
    2019-03-24 05:10

    I absolutely loved this book as a kid. I'd definitely have given this book 5 stars then. My dad still has his old hardback version from the Children's Weekly Reader club. It is a fun fantasy about a young boy who meets and has fantastic adventures with a phoenix. As an adult, I found this book to be less fun than I recalled. The phoenix is self absorbed and stuffy, and their adventures are a little crazy and certainly on the dangerous side. (but that is after all, part of the fun to a child, right?) I read this aloud to my two youngest children and they certainly enjoyed it, but didn't totally love it.A good solid, totally clean classic for 5-8th graders who love fantasy.

  • Kym Snell
    2019-03-19 09:01

    This book is 10 out of 10!!!I first read David and the Phoenix in 1957 when I was in fifth grade. I was enchanted and have thought about this book all through my life. I have probably read it 20 times as an adult for nothing more than the opportunity to spend some more time with both the Phoenix and David . I could not rate this book on entertainment scale any higher ! It is wonderful and I am going to look to buy two hard copies to give to children of friends, hoping they will be as enchanted and enthralled I have been.

  • Adam
    2019-02-24 02:52

    I, like many reviewers here, was smitten with this book in the late 1950's at a very young age. I've browsed the Amazon reviewers and now the reviewers here and for sure there is a "brotherhood and sisterhood" of 1950's youngsters who got old, found themselves in the 21st century, but NEVER forgot David and the one and only Phoenix. For us, David and the Phoenix is a very special book. It imprinted itself in our heads and our hearts. And after all these years we still get a bit "emotional" at the end. I've still got my David book today.

  • Read Ng
    2019-03-01 05:14

    A children's book. This book was mentioned often in one of the Honor Harrington works. I had to sample it. I suspect it very likely that the only readers of this book in the last decade are all enticed by the mention in the Honor Harrington book, At All Costs.A delightful children's book. Best suited for those under 8. It would make for a great bedtime story. It is full of wonder and imagination. It is difficult to properly appreciate how good this story is for an adult. I likely would rate it higher, if I was 8 years old again.Have a GoodReads. Share this one with you children.