Read Street of the Five Moons by Elizabeth Peters Online

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Vicky Bliss, a brain with a body like a centerfold, often has a tough time getting people to take her seriously. But when it comes to medieval history, this blonde beauty knows her stuff -- and she's a master at solving mysteries that would turn the art world upside down. Vicky gasped at the sight of the exquisite gold pendant her boss at Munich's National Museum held in hVicky Bliss, a brain with a body like a centerfold, often has a tough time getting people to take her seriously. But when it comes to medieval history, this blonde beauty knows her stuff -- and she's a master at solving mysteries that would turn the art world upside down. Vicky gasped at the sight of the exquisite gold pendant her boss at Munich's National Museum held in his hand. The Charlemagne talisman replica, along with a note in hieroglyphs, was found sewn into the suit pocket of an unidentified man found dead in an alley. Vicky vows to find the master craftsman who created it. It's a daring chase that takes her all the way to Rome and through the dusty antique centers and moonlit streets of the most romantic city in the world. But soon she's trapped in a treacherous game of intrigue that could cost her life -- or her heart... Vicky Bliss, a brain with a body like a centerfold, often has a tough time getting people to take her seriously. But when it comes to medieval history, this blonde beauty knows her stuff -- and she's a master at solving mysteries that would turn the art world upside down. Vicky gasped at the sight of the exquisite gold pendant her boss at Munich's National Museum held in his hand. The Charlemagne talisman replica, along with a note in hieroglyphs, was found sewn into the suit pocket of an unidentified man found dead in an alley. Vicky vows to find the master craftsman who created it. It's a daring chase that takes her all the way to Rome and through the dusty antique centers and moonlit streets of the most romantic city in the world. But soon she's trapped in a treacherous game of intrigue that could cost her life -- or her heart...Vicky Bliss, a brain with a body like a centerfold, often has a tough time getting people to take her seriously. But when it comes to medieval history, this blonde beauty knows her stuff -- and she's a master at solving mysteries that would turn the art world upside down. Vicky gasped at the sight of the exquisite gold pendant her boss at Munich's National Museum held in his hand. The Charlemagne talisman replica, along with a note in hieroglyphs, was found sewn into the suit pocket of an unidentified man found dead in an alley. Vicky vows to find the master craftsman who created it. It's a daring chase that takes her all the way to Rome and through the dusty antique centers and moonlit streets of the most romantic city in the world. But soon she's trapped in a treacherous game of intrigue that could cost her life -- or her heart......

Title : Street of the Five Moons
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780812512441
Format Type : Mass Market Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Street of the Five Moons Reviews

  • Cphe
    2019-02-22 10:12

    A fun read, a relatively fast read. Vicky Bliss is quite delightful being resouceful, blonde, curvaceous and brainy. (appearances can be deceptive)Loved the setting of the novel, the references to art and culture. The highlight of the novel was the repartee between the ambiguous John and Vicky. Some of their dialogue and snarky asides were priceless. Written in a light hearted vein which I enjoyed. A refreshing departure from my usual reading fare. You often forget just how engaging some of these "older" novels are.

  • Jacob Proffitt
    2019-03-18 10:02

    A fun read and, quite frankly, a better starting place to the series than the first. It's a touch dated (written in the 70s), but Vicky's snark is delightful. I do wish she wasn't quite so prone to relatively serious errors in judgment—it undermines her supposed intelligence, even if she does cope well in extricating herself from the consequences. Oh, and I really hope Sir John shows up in later books. Which means I'm actually looking forward to later books. Huh...

  • Angela
    2019-02-26 03:08

    Ah yeah, now we're talkin'. With the second installment, Street of the Five Moons, the Vicky Bliss series starts getting its feet under it--in no small part due to Vicky's infamous love interest John Smythe coming on camera.Those of you who are fans of these books know what I'm talking about; those of you who aren't, if you like the chemistry between Laura Holt and Remington Steele in the old series, Vicky and John will feel very, very familiar. John is dashing, incorrigible, absolutely infuriating, and he charms my socks right off while he's busily charming Vicky against her better judgment.There may be places more classically romantic than Rome in which this novel could have been set, but I'm hard pressed to think of any of them. It's a wonderful backdrop against which to stage breakings and enterings, priceless (and stolen) art objects, nighttime chases, kidnappings, crisscrossed communications, and the obligatory wounding of the aforementioned handsome, dashing, and infuriating hero. This is classic Elizabeth Peters, and fun from the first word to the last. Four stars.

  • Zdenka
    2019-02-28 06:16

    After reading all the Amelia Peabody books, I wanted to continue with the Vicky Bliss series, but honestly, even after the second book, it doesn't work for me in the way the A.P. books did - not very original (once I read the first series), not very convincing nor likeable characters, and to be honest, I miss my old friends Sethos and Ramses - John Smythe just doesn't make the cut.

  • Louise
    2019-03-13 06:06

    A comfort read for me - just plain fun.

  • Andree
    2019-03-16 07:54

    3.5 stars.So, here's the thing... There was a kidnapping. I wish I hated kidnapping plots less. I really do. But they annoy me a lot in 95% of cases. This was not entirely an exception.It was better done than a lot of them are. It wasn't hateful.But... but... (view spoiler)[Okay, I get it, or really, I get them. And by them, I mean the two things that I'm assuming this book (series?) is supposed to be based on.1. Vicky Bliss is a nosy/adventurying protagonist! But instead of being your omnicompetent nosy/adventurying protagonist, that is able to do a triple backflip out of any awkward situation and somehow land on her feet, Vicky Bliss is impetuatous and impulsive and often runs into a situation like a bull in a china shop, not considering all of the ramifications until two minutes too late! Thus making her super!relatable and awesome! Because she is not your cookie-cutter, super-perfect protagonist! Making her complete lack of consideration of her own safety ALL OKAY. DId I mention that she was impetuous and impulsive, reacts to goading and loves a good adventure? 2. John Smythe is a bit of a jerk. With a questionable moral code. And motives that are not always clear. But underneath it all he has a heart of gold! And he is super charming! And really, who are we to judge his questionable ethics? He is SO CHARMING. And the snark with Vicky is such fun! They are so well-matched! And what woman doesn't secretly love a bit of a bad boy?This is really going to make it seem like I don't like the book. I do like the book. It really *is* fun.It's just that, well, even if Vicky doesn't always think things through first, I do find that she shows a ridiculous lack of concern for her own well-being, particularly given that the events of Book #1 in the series happened not that long ago, and the sort of behaviour she displayed in it almost got her killed. I just think that even if book 1 gave you a serious taste for adventure, it would have also given you a healthy respect for the danger as well. A compulsion to investigate is understandable, but I found it stretching credulity more than a little that after being KIDNAPPED she would go back to the location of her kidnapping as a guest, without taking even rudimentary safety procedures (and I do *not* count scheduled phone calls to her scatter-brained/crazy boss in that category).And I'm not sold on John Smythe. The banter is fun. I love the banter between him and Vicky a lot. But I do not let the jerk!face characters off the hook simply because they are charming. He rescues her from kidnapping by knocking her out cold. He threatens, he goads, he tries to manipulate... I don't know. The two of them are charming, but I don't know. I'll grant that he's a million times better than that dead weight Tony, from book 1. But I'm not entirely sure I like Smythe all that much, even if he does shine by comparison. (hide spoiler)]I just... it got a bit eye-rolly at times for me.

  • Barbara ★
    2019-03-03 10:18

    I'm pretty much in the minority with this one. As much as I love Elizabeth Peters's Amelia Peabody series, I just can't get into Vicky Bliss. She's more a blonde bimbo who uses her assets to her advantage while bitching about them than an intelligent investigator. Supposedly she's an expert on art forgery yet in this one she's hot on the tail of jewelry forgers which she knows absolutely nothing about. Will little to no evidence or even a case for that matter, Vicky yets off to Rome in search of an explanation for a dead body in Munich with a mysterious note in his pocket along with an excellent forged piece of jewelry.Vicky in spite of her intelligence, hasn't an ounce of common sense and blatantly leaves clues to her shenanigans and they is surprised when she is kidnapped. Duh. Sir John Smythe is caught up in the whole affair though Vicky has not clue as to his motives for rescuing her. Sure he's charming but he's also an asshat at times using more force than necessary and with a lady (relatively speaking) at that.At the end of the first book I thought I liked Vicky and was looking forward to reading further in the series since I hear it gets better. Unfortunately, this book put the cabash on that thought. Definitely not a series I will waste any further time on.On a side note.....I listened to the audiobook narrated by Kathleen Turner. What a mistake! She read too fast, she put odd pauses in sentences, she mumbled and stumbled over words though her Italian and German were flawless (I assume anyway). I wonder if I would have enjoyed this more had I read it myself but I'm not masochist enough to try the next one.

  • Theresa
    2019-03-18 09:50

    This book was way better than the first in the series. In this book, Vicky meets John Smythe (pronounced Smith), a jewel thief, who becomes a running character throughout the series. I read one of this series years and years ago (I have no idea which one it was) but I remember the book having an element of mystery and romance to it (but way more focused on mystery). When I read the first book, it did not even remotely feel like what I remembered because John was not a character in that book at all. I kept thinking that she had a romantic interest and that it wasn't with the guy who was interested in her in the first book--but I couldn't put a name to the character. Come to find out, he wasn't in the book at all.However, John Smythe is introduced in this book and he provides romance and comedy to the mystery. Vicky Bliss goes to Rome to discover who made a close to perfect reproduction of a piece of jewelry her museum owns (so close you might not be able to tell the difference between the real and the fake) found sewn into the pocket of a dead man.An easy, fun, and light read, and interesting as it was written in 1978 so some of the references were a little outdated but that just added to its charm for me.Will definitely read another in this series.

  • Trin
    2019-02-23 04:00

    I decided to give this series another shot after not really likingBorrower of the Night all that much. This...really did not do anything to change my opinion. Although several people commented that the introduction of John Smythe (or "Smythe," really) improved things vastly, I didn't really find that to be the case. John is actually described on the basis that he looks like Peter Wimsey, but *cough* — Sir, you are no Peter Wimsey! And Vicky is not Harriet. Which, admittedly, is in general hardly a fair basis for comparison—if anyone could whip up characters as awesome asDorothy L. Sayers', well, I'd have even more things I'd want to read than I already do. But Peters evokes the comparison herself, and then does not look favorable in light of it. The mystery failed to surprise or engage me, the various bits of alliance-switching were both predictable and lame, and the patina of "spooky" stuff was not even as freaky as an especially weak episode of Supernatural. Sadly, I'm afraid this just isn't an author who works for me.

  • C.P. Lesley
    2019-03-14 09:09

    A perennial favorite—never disappoints.Beautiful, bonde Vicky Bliss holds a doctorate in art history, but too few people—men especially—can see beyond her centerfold proportions to the brain beneath. When an almost undetectable forgery of a famous piece of Dark Ages jewelry shows up on a corpse in the back alleys of Munich, the local police send Vicky to Rome to investigate. The search takes her to the Via delle Cinque Luna and an equally blond, handsome Englishman. Too bad he turns out to be a thief, an art forger, and part of the very criminal gang that Vicky is hunting....

  • Rachel
    2019-03-24 05:16

    I really like Vicky Bliss. She's intelligent, sexy, adventurous, impulsive, and funny.I highly recommend Elizabeth Peters already because of my love for her other character, Amelia Peabody, and now I have another reason to love this author.

  • Laurie Way
    2019-02-25 02:49

    Exploring a new character from this favorite author. I was not disappointed!

  • Renee M
    2019-03-08 09:04

    The librarian at the school where I work was a huge Vicky Bliss fan. I am a huge fan of Amelia Peabody so I decided to give this new heroine a try. First, I read Borrower of the Night and found it to be just okay. Some great moments but not the stuff of immediate fandom. Then I read Night Train to Memphis, which was bloody brilliant. Just the right amount of snark, humor, repartee, and intrigue. So now I'm backfilling. Camelot Caper was next on the list since it introduces Sir John. And it clipped along well enough. But it's the pairing of Vicky and John that really makes the series click. They meet here in the Street of Five Moons and they are entertaingly wonderful together. It's the perfect pairing that harkens back to the witty repartee of the screwball comedies and Hitchcockian couples of yesteryear. I'm looking forward to more time spent in their company. I wonder what new swindle will need to be thwarted?

  • Julie
    2019-03-11 06:16

    I found out a little about Elizabeth Peters. She has a Ph.D from the University of Chicago in Egyptology, which she received at the age of 23. She has written two books on ancient Egypt (both of which have been continuously in print since first publication), but has primarily written mystery and suspense novels. She has been a published writer since 1964. Elizabeth Peters is a nom de plume, as is Barbara Michaels. (Real name is Barbara Mertz.) Mertz has written approximately a gajillion novels.I thought that Peters/Mertz's personal life admirable enough to go search out this sequal, which I have to say I liked better than the first. I've heard this series referred to (positively) as "bathtub books" -- easy and fun to read without trying To Make a Statement. I liked this one enough that I think I'll go search out #3.

  • Julie Johnson
    2019-03-20 09:49

    I read Elizabeth peters back when I was a teenager...I read the Amelia Peabody adventures. I hadn't really read any others til a quick trip to the library had me pulling her books off the shelves just so I had something to take home (i had a few minutes to spare and choose to spend them at the library but I had to make my book selections FAST!)I ended up hooked on these Vicki Bliss mysteries. I caught some kind of flu bug, had to rest in bed, and these fun loving adventures were the only thing keeping me sane! This is the first one I read, and Sir John has to be the most heroic and romantic anti-hero since Han Solo. I just love him and all their witty repartee.A real joy. A great fun read that still stands the test of time (though written over 20 years ago).

  • Tara Carpenter
    2019-03-23 06:12

    As much as I adore Peters's Amelia Peabody series, I can't work up much enthusiasm for these Vicky Bliss books. I thought the 1st one was terrible, and though this one was better, I almost put it down several times in the first half. It did get better after that, with some interesting characters and a cliched but still fun premise and action. I waited a few years between books 1 and 2. I might get to number 3 next year. I recommend Amelia Peabody series wholeheartedly though. Especially book 1, The Crocodile on the Sandbank, book 6, The Last Camel Died at Noon, and book 12, He Shall Thunder in the Sky.

  • Katie
    2019-03-12 08:50

    SIR JOHN SMYTH! I want more!This was slow in places (view spoiler)[it felt like it took forever for them to escape (hide spoiler)], but, overall, I was really into it. More so than the first one. I like the (presumably) permanent cast of characters a lot.Though I do wish that Vicky wasn't the only "good" female character.

  • mary
    2019-03-21 11:11

    Elizabeth Peters is my favorite brain candy author - she is smart to satirize even the genre she occupies. I always laugh and usually finish the books in a day.

  • Hannah
    2019-03-02 10:01

    #2 in the Vicky Bliss series. Enter John Smythe, one of my favorite fictional male characters. He and Vicky's verbal spars are just one of the reasons I love this series so much.

  • Kat
    2019-03-22 06:04

    Fun, but definitely sillier than the previous installment.

  • Barbara Douglas
    2019-03-24 10:58

    These are so much fun; light, quick and funny, but packing a surprising emotional punch, I find myself re-reading when I am at a loose end. In this one the series really gets going; John is the quintessential suave English ne'er do well, a type I find utterly irresistible.

  • Jean Hall
    2019-03-12 09:04

    This was kind of interesting, but most of the characters I couldn't get too attached to. Still, I did read the whole thing, just to see how it ended.

  • Kate Rupley
    2019-03-17 03:09

    Good fun. Lots of interesting information about art and Italy. Love Barbara Rosenblaut.

  • Westley
    2019-03-13 03:18

    Elizabeth Peters was a wonderful writer who hit her stride with the Amelia Peabody series. It was fun to revisit one of her earlier series.

  • 'jean
    2019-02-26 10:57

    It was fun but not very believable. The heroine/mystery solver is supposed to be smart and she does some stupid things. The book could use some editing.

  • Lisa Schensted
    2019-02-22 02:53

    in a sentence or two: Vicky Bliss is hot on the trail of a gang of artistic forgeries in Rome. her sly detective work (insert sarcasm here) leads her to be kidnapped, beat up, be whisked away to an Italian mansion, and attacked by garden statues while on the case of the remarkably accurate forgeries being sold to museums.having read and loved the first Vicky Bliss mystery, Borrower of the Night, i knew i was in for a treat. Vicky is smart, witty, snarky, and all around awesome. while working for Herr Schmidt at Munich's National Museum, some suspicious activities take place. like an unidentified man carrying what seems to be a priceless and ancient gold pendant sewn into his jacket. always ready for an adventure, Vicky is off to Rome to try and discover what she can - based on a little scrap of paper found at the scene containing a quasi-clue.due to school and other commitments (work, laundry, etc.), i didn't get a chance to read this as quickly as i would have liked. i feel like the Vicky Bliss mysteries are best read as uninterrupted as possible. that being said, i still really dug this. Vicky's discoveries are well balanced with the humor, sarcasm, and wit that sets these novels apart from other mysteries i've read. you don't know who to suspect, or why, and quite frankly - neither does Vicky. mainly it's a hodge podge of suspicions and clues leading up to the dramatic "ah-ha" moments. i don't mean that in a demeaning way at all - in fact, i absolutely love that method of suspense. plus, with a new love interest, John Smythe, i was totally sucked in.i am wary to compare books to other books, because i feel like they are written to be judged on their own merit. however, if i had to, i'd say that i preferred Borrower of the Night to this one. only because that had a gothic/creepy ghost feel whereas this was more focused on the Italian mansion/secret gang of art thieves feel. both solid mysteries were kept exciting with suspense and the fantastic voice of Vicky.fave quote: "I am by nature an optimistic person. But during those minutes in the mud and the dark, alone with a man who was quietly bleeding to death on my lap, with a mob of murderous brutes scouring the fields to find us...I was depressed." (271)fix er up: i didn't want it to end. seriously. when i finally got the couple hours free i needed to sit and plow through this, i just couldn't get enough! good thing there are more mysteries for Vicky Bliss to solve...

  • Dorothy
    2019-03-06 05:48

    In this second entry of the Vicky Bliss series, Vicky meets "Sir" John Smythe and things get a lot more interesting. It was great fun reading this book that is half romance, half mystery in the tradition of Elizabeth Peters books. It was a page-turner and a very quick read.As the book opens, Vicky is working at the museum in Munich for Karl Schmidt whom she met in the first novel. Her friend, Tony, has disappeared, presumably back to America, and the museum is presented with a mystery. A man has been found dead on the streets of Munich with a rare jewel, an artistic masterpiece, sewn into his clothing. As it happens, it is an artistic masterpiece that is one of the treasures of the museum. Except it really isn't. It is a perfect copy. The mystery is who made the copy? Where did it come from? How was someone able to copy the piece so very perfectly and for what purpose? Was someone planning to steal the museum's treasure and replace it with the copy?These are the questions that appeal to the spy persona in Schmidt and he convinces Vicky to take on the task of tracing the copy and finding out who made it and what that person is up to. The trail takes her to Rome, to the Street of the Five Moons. There she meets John Smythe and the game is on.After the first entry in this series really didn't grab me, I was hesitant about reading the second. I needn't have worried. Peters has hit her stride with Vicky Bliss in this book and I am now looking forward to the remaining entries in the series. In typical Peters fashion, the novel is light and a bit frothy, the main characters have a sardonic wit that is very appealing, and things move along at a very quick pace. Very diverting.

  • Kat Lebo
    2019-03-21 08:10

    Street of the Five Moons, A Vicky Bliss mysteryby Elizabeth PetersThe late Barbara Mertz (aka Elizabeth Peters and/or Barbara Michaels) has been a long time favorite of mine. I was a big fan of her Amelia Peabody mystery series, but have enjoyed her writing no matter what pen name she was using. This is the second Vicky Bliss I've read, and I think a trip to my local library for more in this series is definitely in order!Vicky Bliss is a 6 foot Nordic art expert who cannot list "reticence" on her resume of personal traits. Striding headlong into situations without a lot of forethought puts her in some very interesting predicaments, and this story shows that trait very well. Alerted to an immensely successful art forgery by her mentor, Professor Schmidt, she is sufficiently intrigued to accept his proposal that she travel to Rome to investigate further. She gains a few life and death experiences, a slew of new enemies, a couple of new friends, and a new dog along the way. In an adventure where her survival often depends on one of the so-called bad-guys of the story, she pushes and prods and stumbles her way through art forgery, political intrigue, social status, murder, and other fun things to do in Rome. Peters' writing carries the reader along on a sea of mystery with a hint of romance, a large dollop of danger, many a chuckle, and a rousing good time. Great editing and proofing. Excellent plotting and pacing. Plenty of suspects and many the twist and turn to keep the reader guessing all along the way. Great summer read. So great that I went searching in my stack of unread books for something else she wrote and found it -- under the pen name of Barbara Michaels. :-)

  • ephrielle
    2019-02-28 07:15

    Incredibly unbelievable.What adult lacks even basic commons sense. Who would really do the things she does? Leaving purposeful and obvious evidence of a break in, make out with one of your abductors, think you can solve some conjecture based scheme. All of it is just ridiculous. And Vicky who apparently doesn't like her womanly figure going through all the length to cultivate it. If she were really bugged wouldn't she dress it down not accentuate. And the "clues" she finds are just bogus. Like the "address" she finds, do people really not write in English anymore but draw out an address? The entire book is a farce, silly and complete nonsense.Not the type of mystery I have dabbled in before. The entire "mystery" or quest began under the flimsiest of suspicion. If they weren't a bit crazy non of the investigation would have happened. Vicky only manages to not get killed and figure out the "mystery" with a heavy dollop of luck and good graces. It is more like she just stumbles around in the dark and perseveres stubbornly. Her romantic choices are daft.There isn't that much mystery occurring. Early on I was certain who was the culprit I just didn't know why they would bother.Not terribly funny but a complete romp. With a tinge of female bond thrown in. Mildly entertaining but not a solid read.

  • Ida
    2019-03-16 03:53

    This was okay for a light read but not memorable. I started reading this book, not knowing when it was written. I had bought it, at a discount, at a local bookstore. At one point, the main character needs to find the gallery or private residence that is the home to certain paintings she has identified. Her advice to herself was to look for a library that was open. I immediately thought, this doesn't make sense, why doesn't she check on-line. I then thought to check the copyright date - written in the 70's. The lack of internet and google availability not to mention cell phones makes some of the events seem almost quaint. Some of the story-lines would not work today for that reason.The cover doesn't reflect what the book is about - a substantial portion is a chase around Rome and its suburbs. I enjoyed these descriptions.The characters are almost caricatures in some way: the wealthy eccentric, his spoiled Adonis-like son, the loveable rogue, the slow-witted but voluptuous mistress.At times the novel seemed to verge on farce in the unbelievable sequence of events and the actions of the main character and the situations she finds herself in. I believe this author is quite prolific; I recognized her name so it might be interesting to try something more current by her.