Read thorndon wellington and home my katherine mansfield project bwb texts by Kirsty Gunn Online

thorndon-wellington-and-home-my-katherine-mansfield-project-bwb-texts

‘If I began asking you questions about Wellington ways there would be no end to it …’ Katherine Mansfield ‘I came home to Wellington, to a place half remembered, half real, half fantasy, half fact, remembered and a dream …’ Kirsty Gunn In this exquisitely written ‘notebook’, Kirsty Gunn explores the meaning of home. Returning to the city of her birth after an absence of th‘If I began asking you questions about Wellington ways there would be no end to it …’ Katherine Mansfield ‘I came home to Wellington, to a place half remembered, half real, half fantasy, half fact, remembered and a dream …’ Kirsty Gunn In this exquisitely written ‘notebook’, Kirsty Gunn explores the meaning of home. Returning to the city of her birth after an absence of thirty years, Gunn’s exploration quickly takes on new forms, developing into a ‘Katherine Mansfield Project’. Zig-zagging across Thorndon streets, Wellington hills and New Zealand childhoods, Gunn’s project charts a terrain of emotional attachment and the source of potent imaginative forces. A wonderfully connective work from the winner of the 2013 New Zealand Post Book of the Year. BWB Texts are short books on big subjects from great New Zealand writers....

Title : thorndon wellington and home my katherine mansfield project bwb texts
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 21467712
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 77 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

thorndon wellington and home my katherine mansfield project bwb texts Reviews

  • S.K.Fischer
    2018-11-17 02:37

    Well done, Kirsty Gunn.This little book stirred up some big deep emotions. I cried at the end. I will keep it with me as I continue to live in far away places.

  • Marcus Hobson
    2018-11-07 09:53

    A delightful short book which has made me want to go back and read some more stories by Katherine Mansfield and also to find some of Kirsty Gunn's work.Coming back to Wellington, the place of her birth, Gunn spent a few months as a writer in residence at the Rendall Cottage in Thorndon. This allowed her to reconnect with places she knew as a girl as well as bring her own daughters to attend the same school that she did for a few months.There are lovely parallels between Gunn and Mansfield, about leaving New Zealand and thinking about coming back, as well as wonderful insights about seeing a once familiar city again. Interspersed between details of Gunn's Mansfield projet are short snatches of fiction that really catch to mood of a cold wet Wellington winter. Something that an outsider would notice more than a resident, little details about the need for flannelette sheets and the call of the 'dark-blue black bird" as she describes the Tui. A lovely book that will leave you with memories.

  • Josephine Ensign
    2018-11-13 04:42

    Written in the form of a 'notebook' or almost 'scrapbook'--with bits of fiction and quotes from Mansfield mixed in with personal reflections, it is somehow both haunting and 'twee.' I read this while in Auckland and plan to revisit it this coming week while staying in Wellington. It may make even more sense to me once I am back in windy Wellie.

  • Diane Warrington
    2018-11-07 08:58

    I found this little book on the shelf in my school library and it is a real treasure. It showed me the links between Mansfield's writing and the place of Wellington and how Wellington is indeed a 'place'. This is a writer coming home and renewing a relationship with a unique world, which Gunn describes with great clarity and love. "Pearlit skies." Yes indeed. Hughly recommended for people who love accomplished wordsmiths. I'm now going to read Big Music.

  • Malcolm Hebron
    2018-11-09 05:50

    Kirsty Gunn returns to her native New Zealand as a Randell Fellow, and reflects on her own relationship to the country she left (she now teahes in Dundee) and to Katherine Mansfield, who also left NZ for Europe, never to return. There are reflections on the meaning of home, exile and memory which take in the author's personal experience, but refract it through Mansfield's own writing. KM couldn't wait to leave the old country, but in her restless life in Europe she recreated it down to the tiniest detail, at the same time layering NZ and Europe together to create a place that exists only in the stories. Gunn writes on Mansfield's deep concern with home, the family, the dramas of the domestic sphere; we learn of the unique qualities of NZ light, whch inform a reading of 'Sun and Moon', and a visit to the KM museum becomes a moving retrieval of personal memories. The 'Project' mixes journal, essay and fiction. Themes are brought out through some arresting short stories which explore ideas of travel, hauntings by the past and loneliness: KM presides over these, though they ahve their own strong personal voice. 'My Katherine Manfield Project' is a beguiling read, which sets up a refreshinglly new way of engaging with an author. I had some passing cavils. Though Gunn is the expert, I'm not sure it's true that the whole of 'Prelude' is seen through Kezia's eyes, as she seems to imply: part of its modernist feel comes from the multiple points of view. And a reader new to KM might not guess that she wrote many stories which are not set in New Zealand. The book is beautifully produced by Notting Hill editions, a publisher committed to the essay form and contributing to its resurgence in the english-speaking world.

  • Kirsty
    2018-11-07 04:44

    All about the interplay between what is home, and when you leave the place you grew up and live somewhere else, what does it mean when you return. It was interesting and some of Kirsty Gunn's short stories are arrestingly moving. I think I would have got more from it if I'd read anything by Katherine Mansfield and also the fact that it focuses on the fact both women have left Wellington for London, and having never been to new Zealand I almost felt a bit outside some points, like there was an expectation of familiarity.