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the-eagles-shadow

One man stands against the might of the Roman Empire. His name is Caradoc.In Rome a new Emperor, Claudius, accedes the throne. But he is politically weak, enemies who would take his place circle and plot. If he is to survive Claudius needs a triumph, one that marks him as a leader of men.Claudius’s eye turns to the mysterious isle of Britannia, home of the supernatural DruOne man stands against the might of the Roman Empire. His name is Caradoc.In Rome a new Emperor, Claudius, accedes the throne. But he is politically weak, enemies who would take his place circle and plot. If he is to survive Claudius needs a triumph, one that marks him as a leader of men.Claudius’s eye turns to the mysterious isle of Britannia, home of the supernatural Druids and brutal, wild-eyed warriors, reputed to fight naked. The place not even Julius Caesar could conquer.AD43 and a massive invasion force, commanded by Aulus Plautius, lands on a tiny corner of Britannia. Caradoc, King of the country’s most powerful tribe, assembles an army to throw his enemy back over the water and into Gaul. But divisions are rife and there are those who are secretly working with the Romans for their own benefit. The very future of the country is at risk and only one man can safeguard it…Praise for Keith Nixon’s WorkA hugely enjoyable debut novel from Keith Nixon.'Ian Ayris, author of Abide With Me'Moves faster than a speeding bullet. Can't wait for more from Keith Nixon.'Tony Black, author of The Last TigerCool, creative and downright crude, THE FIX will get your heart pumping.'Gerard Brennan, author of FIREPROOF'Sharply observed, fast paced. Hard as a knuckleduster.'Richard Godwin, author of Apostle Rising'A blast from first page to the last, this high-octane debut takes aim at the corporate world and is fast, furious and a lot of fun. If there’s a knack to writing dark comedy, Nixon surely has it.'Nick Quantrill, author of The Late Greats'The Fix is a gritty, multi-layered novel which features a glorious mix of characters - all with that great human quality of being flawed and unique. Nixon's writing is what really makes this stand out. A fast-paced and quite excellent debut novel. 'Luca Veste, author of Dead Gone...

Title : the eagles shadow
Author :
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ISBN : 22403383
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 299 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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the eagles shadow Reviews

  • Col
    2019-01-08 03:32

    KEITH NIXON - THE EAGLE'S SHADOW (2014)Synopsis/blurb....One man stands against the might of the Roman Empire. His name is Caradoc.In Rome a new Emperor, Claudius, accedes the throne. But he is politically weak, enemies who would take his place circle and plot. If he is to survive Claudius needs a triumph, one that marks him as a leader of men.Claudius’s eye turns to the mysterious isle of Britannia, home of the supernatural Druids and brutal, wild-eyed warriors, reputed to fight naked. The place not even Julius Caesar could conquer.AD43 and a massive invasion force, commanded by Aulus Plautius, lands on a tiny corner of Britannia. Caradoc, King of the country’s most powerful tribe, assembles an army to throw his enemy back over the water and into Gaul.But divisions are rife and there are those who are secretly working with the Romans for their own benefit. The very future of the country is at risk and only one man can safeguard it…Read the UK best selling historical fiction novel everyone is talking about. The Eagle's Shadow reached no. 1 in historical mysteries, no. 2 in war fiction on the UK Amazon charts.Praise for Keith Nixon’s Work'A gripping story with a fantastic plot, full of family dynamics, war and political intrigue.'PM Harrison'A compelling story.'Books and Pals blog'A hugely enjoyable debut novel from Keith Nixon.'Ian Ayris, author of Abide With Me------------My take......I’m a big fan of Keith Nixon’s books so decided to take a punt on one of his historical efforts which is a big change of genre for me. How did we go then?Well I enjoyed it up to a point, but I don’t think it has redirected my reading compass.We are in ancient Britain and the Romans are coming again. Intrigue and in-fighting among the British tribes, some want to rally together to repel the invasion and some have hitched their colours to the Roman mast, feeling an improvement in circumstances for their clan will arise from a Roman conquest. However, those aiding the invaders have to play the time-honoured game of deception, duplicity and subterfuge.We have our heroes and villains and there’s a forging of alliances and a tentative romance….bravery, loyalty, love, family conflicts, friendships enjoyed - with plenty of banter and a sprinkling of humour, battles, camaraderie, death, deceit, double-crossing and an enjoyable tale which I was keen to read through and discover the outcome.I have to assume Nixon has done his research and has blended fact into his fiction, but as I’m not a student of ancient British history I’ll be leaving things at the assumption stage. I feel I know a bit more about the period than I did before, so never a bad thing leaving a book knowing more than when you started.I was entertained, but I don’t feel compelled to read his second book in the series – The Eagle’s Blood - one which I assumes picks up and runs where we leave off here. Caradoc’s adventures will continue without me.3 from 5Keith Nixon has his infrequently updated website/blog here.http://www.keithnixon.co.uk/blogI have previously enjoyed a few from the author, his loosely linked Konstantin - Russian hitman series – Plastic Fantastic, Fat Gary, Dream Land and Russian Roulette. http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11...http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11...http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08...http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11...Thoughts on The Fix which was also read in May coming soon, much more my cup of tea than ancients Brits. Read in May. 2017Published - 2014Page count - 299Source - purchased copyFormat - Kindle http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06...

  • Linda Acaster
    2019-01-19 03:16

    It is good to see a novel with the backdrop of the AD43 invasion from the viewpoint of the native Britons, and Keith Nixon makes a decent fist of setting out the disparate pieces of groundwork that made the Roman bridgehead possible. The tribal in-fighting, family in-fighting, as well as intertribal feuding, all played their part, as did direct betrayal for short-sighted personal gain. However, it became a novel of much more depth when the viewpoint of the Roman contingent began to be threaded through the story, bringing with it their own personal stories, motivations and political machinations.The author is superb at conveying battle scenes, from single combat to hit and run skirmishes, to the horror and confusion of being caught in the middle of a flexing battle-line melee. I did feel as if I were there, and I couldn’t stop reading. An excellent introduction to a series.

  • Al
    2019-01-01 23:13

    When I read historical fiction I find much of what I get out of it is a greater sense of the true history through the viewpoints of the characters. It becomes more real when experienced through the eyes of someone who was there than it could ever be from reading text books and whatever part of the history teacher’s drone penetrated my thick skull and stuck through the decades since.I quickly realized that my knowledge of British history from the time this story takes place (first century AD) was a blank slate. Maybe we never covered that in history class except as it related to the rise and fall of the Roman Empire (definitely covered), or possibly I’d purged it to make room in my limited memory for more music trivia. This gave me a chance to learn, or at least refresh, that gap.At the time the area that is now Britain was controlled by numerous tribes, not the unified country it is today. Cooperation between tribes was critical if they were to resist the invading Romans who were looking to expand their empire. It’s a compelling story with political infighting, war strategy, and family dynamics, all playing a part in the tale. I want to use the cliché “age old story,” because what stood out for me is how human nature hasn’t evolved, with self-interest driving all decisions, people playing both sides of a conflict, and the struggle for power played out in much the same way as it would today.**Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **

  • Guy
    2019-01-03 01:33

    I was not sure about this book at first but soon warmed to it. I think I was concerned that where as the Roman account of the invasion of Britain was well documented, the Celtic side was not. However, this is a ripping yarn and I shall certainly read the next in the series. The book is fast moving but has a great sense of authenticity.

  • Keith Nixon
    2019-01-11 01:12

    This is from the review by PM Harrison. Keith Nixon is author of the crime fiction novels The Fix and The Konstantin Novella series, both of which achieved excellent reviews. With The Eagle’s Shadow, Nixon has taken to the historical fiction genre, but is his writing here as well accomplished as his writing in the crime genre?The Eagle’s Shadows tells of Claudius, the new Roman emperor who is politically weak and in desperate need of triumph. He’s fixed his eyes on Britannia, the home of druids and warriors, the place not even Caesar himself could conquer.If there’s one key to historical fiction it’s finding the right balance between accurate writing and entertaining writing. CJ Samson, for instance, writes exceptional historical fiction that is both historically believable and highly entertaining. Sadly, I’m no historical expert, so I’m not in a position to judge how historically accurate aspects of this book are; but the book certainly is believable, and seemingly educational too.I felt like I’d travelled back to my A-Level history class (US readers: A-Levels are the exams us Brits take at age 18). At the time in which the story is set, Britain isn’t the unified and fecking awesome country it is today. It’s packed full of disparate tribes that must be united if they are to overcome the threat of the Romans; and that’s largely the basis for the drama in Nixon’s book.It’s a gripping story with a fantastic plot, full of family dynamics, war and political intrigue. What’s best about it is the fact that the story is still relevant today; it tells certain truths about humanity that are highly relevant today.I did find some of the writing to be a little cliché when it comes to descriptions. There are throwaways like “His attention peaked” (which should likely be “his attention was piqued”). And there are times when I would like to see more personality injected into the descriptions. But I am also aware of the fact that I am a notoriously picky sod. So, I’m not going to berate Nixon too much on account of this minor points.Running at around 95,000 words (approximately), The Eagle’s Shadow is noticeably tighter than the average historical fiction (which average around 110K). It shows, too. The plot is tight and keeps the pages turning, without the reader getting bogged down in too much superfluous detail. Much historical fiction involves itself with research and details unessential to the story, which can drown the plot in too much history. Not so with Nixon, who makes sure to keep his story front and centre.Overall, Nixon has presented a well crafted story with an engaging plot, and though I did find some of the descriptive work a little uninspiring, I still found this to be an entertaining read.Overall: 4 out of 5.

  • David Baird
    2019-01-10 23:34

    This book is a fast paced, epic war story and boy did I enjoy it.First of there is a lot of information in this book but Keith very handily added a section at the beginning of the book to explain the names used within the book since place names have changed over the years along with rivers etc. This was not only useful so I could set the scene but it was also very interesting informationWe find ourselves thrust into time when Rome was planning to invade Britain and the author decided to tell his tale from both the Roman and the Britons view point. This gave a great feel to the book and broke up the action perfectly so you kept reading without even noticing the time pass.Keith has picked a very interesting subject for the book and built on this story with the characters. There are a few I liked a lot.. Fionn & Etain stood out for me. The action with Fionn had me hooked!There are a large number of characters in this book; Because of this some don’t get a chance to develop. Once you read the book you can totally understand why though as there so much going on in the book it would be too much to squeeze in and also the story is so strong and violent it’s inevitable some of these characters will dieThe author goes into some great detail describing the warfare tactics and clearly has researched well.I felt the story easily pulled me in and I even found myself shouting in my head “Move, Move” when it came to clashes between the two armies.One of the most interesting parts of this book for me was the relationships between the tribes in Britain at the time. I won’t spoil the book for you but these relationships coupled with the unified force of the Romans made for an epic taleFrom reading the authors historical notes he gives a great insight into some of the characters and the time period and it’s definitely peaked my interest and made me want to read up on this time period.I’m very pleased to see there is a follow up book and I’m looking forward to reading/reviewing that soonConclusion… Do I think this book is worth the 99p asking price currently on Amazon? Hell yes!If you enjoy tales involving warfare, blood, guts, tension, betrayal then you will certainly like this book

  • Mark Wilson
    2018-12-24 01:36

    Not many writers are brave enough to step outside of their comfort zone when they’ve performed so solidly in one genre already. Fewer still do so as successfully as Keith Nixon has with The Eagle’s Shadow. Keith’s main attributes as a writer, punchy dialogue, keen humour and the ability to so consistently develop a compelling narrative, transfer magnificently to this very different piece from the author of The Fix. Creating a cast of compelling characters and plucking and pulling at elements of their lives and destinies, Keith gives us a master-class in multi-layered storytelling and exceptional characterisation; no mean feat. Considering that he’s crafted this magnificently engaging story in a historical setting so long gone and mostly forgotten, the coherence and pace of the novel is incredibly skilful and clearly the result of some very hard earned knowledge in the research of the times and places.Keith has used the setting effectively and effortlessly to put his characters through the wringer and propel them on a very modern-feeling journey but The Eagle’s Shadow is the perfect blend of historical accuracy and modern pace and succeeds in completely immersing the reader in ancient times.With The Eagle’s Shadow, Keith Nixon shows us why he’s amongst the very best of a new breed of British authors who refuse to play by the old rules and instead prolifically produce engaging, quality works that excite, entertain and challenge the reader. I can’t recommend this novel highly enough.

  • Ryan Bracha
    2019-01-06 23:20

    I don't read historical fiction, let me make that clear from the off. It's like museums, for me. I know all that old business exists, I'm not interested in knowing any more than that. I do read Keith Nixon, however. I find the minimalist writing style of his crime books fascinating and extremely skillful. So when I was presented with the knowledge that he'd ventured out of what I was used to, I was intrigued to say the least, and more than a little impressed with the result.It's a very well researched and delivered delve into an unrecognisable Britain, filled to the brim with peasants and lords, savages and druids, all battling for prominence in a country threatened by an impending attack by a Roman leader with something to prove. For me, as a virgin to the genre, I found it to be extremely well written, with all the back stabbing, ladder climbing (I don't recall anybody climbing any actual ladders, I'm talking about the ladder of power) and violence that you could ask for. Highly recommended.

  • Rory Costello
    2019-01-05 06:37

    This has some of the hardest-rocking battle scenes you could want (circa 1st century A.D.). I used to play the game "Sid Meier's Civilization" a lot, and "The Eagle's Shadow" has similarities, mainly the clashing tribes and the ancient weaponry. But there's really a good deal more depth to the story. Keith Nixon clearly did a vast amount of research into an area of which I knew next to nothing: Britain in that time. Yet it's not dry at all; it translates into a roistering story of infighting and politicking and drinking and wenching and a whole lot more. Sometimes characters can be introduced abruptly, and it is hard to keep track of the place names and tribes. All in all, though, if you liked the classic "I, Claudius" books by Robert Graves, you're likely to enjoy this too. I know I'll be picking up the sequel.

  • Candace
    2018-12-23 00:37

    The Roman invasion of Britain is a favorite interest of mine, so when I saw this on Big Al's Books and Pals I downloaded it right away. This story, the first in a series, is well researched and nicely paced. The sights, sounds, and smells of the battlefields are vividly portrayed. As the author notes, there's not much to go on in the historical record, but he waded in nevertheless and I think did a wonderful job of showing what it must have been like from the perspective of both the Romans and the various tribes of Britain. My only "gripe" about this book is that it could have used, and I mean *really* used, a good editor. Otherwise, I would have gone to five stars. (I hope the next books in the series will receive an editor's attention. I look forward to reading them, edited or not!)

  • Keith Cofield
    2019-01-09 03:32

    Good read on Rome's second invasion of BritainThe book goes behind the scenes showing the different aims of the British command. The betrayals and the actions of loyal Britain's to contain the damage done by traitors. The story documents the landing and difficulties of making and keeping the bridgehead. Worth reading for anyone interested in early British history.