Read death sentences stories of deathly books murderous booksellers and lethal literature by Otto Penzler Jeffery Deaver C.J. Box Ken Bruen Reed Farrel Coleman Peter Blauner Thomas H. Cook Loren D. Estleman Online

death-sentences-stories-of-deathly-books-murderous-booksellers-and-lethal-literature

'What treats you have in store!' IAN RANKIN.Sigmund Freud deals with an unwelcome visitor; Columbo confronts a murderous bookseller; a Mexican cartel kingpin with a fatal weakness for rare books; deadly secrets deep in the London Library: who knew literature could be so lethal? Here are 15 short stories to die for from the world's best crime writers.With an introduction fr'What treats you have in store!' IAN RANKIN.Sigmund Freud deals with an unwelcome visitor; Columbo confronts a murderous bookseller; a Mexican cartel kingpin with a fatal weakness for rare books; deadly secrets deep in the London Library: who knew literature could be so lethal? Here are 15 short stories to die for from the world's best crime writers.With an introduction from Ian Rankin, DEATH SENTENCES includes original, specially commissioned stories about deadly books from Jeffrey Deaver, Andrew Taylor, Laura Lippman, C.J. Box, Anne Perry, Ken Bruen, Thomas H. Cook, Micky Spillaine & Max Adam Collins, Nelson DeMille and John Connolly....

Title : death sentences stories of deathly books murderous booksellers and lethal literature
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ISBN : 23358191
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 560 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

death sentences stories of deathly books murderous booksellers and lethal literature Reviews

  • Caroline
    2019-03-19 14:10

    This is an immensely enjoyable anthology of short stories by some great writers such as John Connolly and Jefferey Deaver. Spanning different decades, the one thing all these tales have in common is books. That's right, books; books that are used as murder weapons, rare books that people will kill to get their hands on and, my personal favourite, first edition manuscripts whose characters come to life. I loved this anthology, it is a bookworm's dream.

  • Nick Scott
    2019-03-13 19:57

    Bought this for cheap at Half Price Books not really expecting much from this collection of mystery stories by big time mystery authors featuring deaths involving books.Ended up enjoying all but maybe one of the stories more than I thought I would.Also, these are pretty easy, light reads and it's not hard to tear through it. Would recommend for book/mystery/crime lovers.

  • Kate Lowe
    2019-03-13 20:03

    I don't normally read much crime but picked this up at the sale in The Works and thought I would give it a try. I wasn't too impressed with the first story by Jeffery Deaver but I'm glad I read on as the stories seemed to get progressively better the further on in the book that they were placed. I particularly enjoyed the very last story by Nelson Demille and will certainly be seeking out more of his work. This anthology is easy to dip in and out of and well worth a read.

  • Wayne Farmer
    2019-02-18 15:56

    I liked the look of this book, its premise seemed interesting and I had hoped for some good murder mysteries. However most of the stories didn't deliver for me. I'm not a huge fan of short stories because they often don't have time to build up like proper novels and either rush introducing the characters or take too long introducing them and then rush the plot. The short stories in this collection are all OK and none of them are bad stories, but for the most part they failed to excite me. Several of the first few stories were very similar in concentrating on Nazi's and Jews and i felt they could have been placed further apart as it meant I could guess where they were going after having the first one. What I really like about this collection was the emphasis on books and most of the stories feature characters who have hundreds of books on their shelves and it made me feel like I wasn't the only person who is obsessed with books! The best stories in the collectio actually came at the end of the collection - "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository" which has a bit of a fantastical spin and was a bit like a "Warehouse 13" (its a TV series if you didn't know) for books, and "The Book Case" which is your typical classic detective story told in the first person.So overall a bit disappointing - not a touch of spookiness or horror which I had hoped for - and a collection of mainly average short stories.

  • Colin Murtagh
    2019-03-17 12:57

    I've seen this book in Waterstones so many times, but finally decided to lift a copy. To be honest, the main reason I hadn't lifted it already was due to the presence of the John Connolly story the The Caxton Private Lending Library & Book Depository which I will admit I loved, but already had. However, I finally bit the bullet, bought it, and I'm so glad I did. This is a book, about books. Mainly crime stories, where books play a major role. Either as murder weapon, motive, or as the driver to the story. As an anthology, there are weaker and stronger stories. The Connolly mentioned earlier, along with the Reed Farrel Coleman and David Bell being the strongest stories to my eyes, although to be fair there's nothing approaching a poor story here. The book as a whole shows the strengths of a good anthology, well chosen stories, powerful writting, and enough of a mix that it doesn't get boring. Well worth picking up

  • Teagan
    2019-03-17 16:07

    Hmm. I have mixed feelings about this one. I'd seen it at Dymocks more times than I could count, in this neat edition paired with another short story anthology. I was all set to buy it when I saw it at my local library, and thought, "You beauty!" But now, as I said, I've got mixed feelings.I supposed I should start with the good. Three stories absolutely blew me away: What's in a Name? by Thomas H. Cook, It's in the Book by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins, and The Caxton Lending Library and Book Depository by John Connolly. Although the other stories were interesting, none of them caught and held my attention like those three did. They made for good reading, to be sure, and I'm glad I read this anthology. What really let it down was the amount of typos! I don't know how those slipped by the authors and the editor...However, overall this was a good read and I would recommend it for people who are obsessed with books, murder mysteries, and/or short stories.

  • Andy Plonka
    2019-03-07 19:20

    I usually hate short stories. This is a collection by many of my favorite mystery writers and it is excellent. The one by Laura Lippman is my favorite. It has a very human or humane ending that really resonates with me. By the way the book is about 100 pages longer than given on its Good Reads main page.

  • Helen
    2019-03-04 15:08

    I loved so many of the authors involved in this, I couldn't miss it., even owning several,of the short stories already. Fantastic read. ESP when you need to just digest a few pages (and not an entire book). You might never look at books the same way again. Wonderful idea!

  • Ashley
    2019-03-16 13:56

    #NCOwn in hardback.FS: "They'd met last night for the first time and now, mid-morning, they were finally starting to let go a bit, to relax, to trust each other."LS: "Well...maybe it will be worth something someday."