Read The Many Faces of God: Science's 400-Year Quest for Images of the Divine by Jeremy Campbell Online

the-many-faces-of-god-science-s-400-year-quest-for-images-of-the-divine

A grand work of philosophy and history, The Many Faces of God shows how our religious conceptions have been shaped by advances in technology and science. Beginning his narrative in the 1600s and concluding with the fervor of the millennium, Jeremy Campbell shows how Isaac Newton and his generation altered the medieval definition of God from one interpreted through divine mA grand work of philosophy and history, The Many Faces of God shows how our religious conceptions have been shaped by advances in technology and science. Beginning his narrative in the 1600s and concluding with the fervor of the millennium, Jeremy Campbell shows how Isaac Newton and his generation altered the medieval definition of God from one interpreted through divine messengers to an all-knowing, autocratic God who watched over the scientific wonders of the universe. Arguing that religions harbor a secret fear that science may one day explain God away, Campbell masterfully shows how twentieth-century technology and theology have become intertwined, often to the detriment of both disciplines. Illuminating the writings of such intellectual luminaries as Calvin, Luther, Einstein, and Niels Bohr, all the way up to John Updike, The Many Faces of God is a sweeping history of religious and scientific thought in the Western world....

Title : The Many Faces of God: Science's 400-Year Quest for Images of the Divine
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393061796
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Many Faces of God: Science's 400-Year Quest for Images of the Divine Reviews

  • Kate
    2018-12-18 17:09

    I liked the premise of this book, and it was interesting overall. However, it was a bit repetative. I think this book could have made its point (and then some) in half the number of words. I also didn't like the author's writing style that much--he jumped around with no transition between time periods and countries. And speaking of countries, I really didn't like the book's implicit focus on England and the US. He discusses scentists and theologians from all over Europe, but traces their influence on these 2 countries only. He makes it sound as if people like Galileo and Bonhoeffer wrote primarily for a British audience, and had absolutely nothing to do with their own nations. There is nothing wrong with focusing on the history of Brittain and its colonies, but that should be made explicit in the book description or introduction, instead of making it look like an overview of a trend in European history in general.

  • Tony
    2018-12-17 10:51

    This was a good look at the often ignored and underplayed links between science and religion. Even for me it was a surprise how the two played off each other in changing how we see the world. His conclusions were valid to me and are worthy of further thought.

  • Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides
    2018-11-27 11:05

    Not only could I not finish this book, I could barely start. The author's style irritated me too much. I'm not sure I can explain this very well, but it felt as if he was creating an emotional word-picture and not really making an argument and supporting it with evidence. I do think narrative modes have a place in historical writing, but there is a limit.Also, it seemed like there was an insufficient time (none, in the small portion of the book I read) spent explaining how his starting point came about.Maybe I missed out on a great book, but I just couldn't make myself go on with this one.

  • Caleb
    2018-12-12 15:57

    While the ultimate theological conclusion I somewhat disagreed with, I found this book one of the best 'history of...' books addressing the topic of the relationship between science and Religion. It focuses on physics instead of biology. Campbell masterfully traces a common thread in how science shapes our image of God throughout so as to make even the most devout believer deeply wonder where one's conceptions of God come from. I myself learned a great deal of absolutely fascinating history from this work and I highly recommend it.

  • Kathleen Dixon
    2018-12-10 18:54

    I started off being really interested in this book - taking notes of pages where I'd like to copy little pieces; intending to write a Book Review for my college portfolio - but it dissipated after a couple of chapters and I can't really say why.Perhaps it's because the subject matter isn't new enough - I wasn't meeting anything I hadn't heard before - and wasn't put in a compelling manner. Sometimes the old is still fascinating, but that largely depends on the writing style etc.So I've decided not to persevere.

  • Blaine Morrow
    2018-12-16 17:04

    Campbell is more concerned with history - particularly theological history - than with exploring the truth or finding solutions, but that is not a criticism. The book has a Western, especially British, slant, but it traces most thought since the 17th century about monotheism and the nature of the universe and its creator.

  • Amanda
    2018-11-28 13:50

    Read some, skimmed some, liked most of it. A context for religious thought in human history.

  • John Hawkins
    2018-12-02 19:13

    A lot of information concerning the years of the growing confidence of science and how it. Slow reading for me, but I was interested in the topic especially since I got it for 1 dollar.