Read Black Women in Sequence: Re-Inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime by Deborah Elizabeth Whaley Online

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Black Women in Sequence takes readers on a search for women of African descent in comics subculture. From the 1971 appearance of the Skywald Publications character "the Butterfly" - the first Black female superheroine in a comic book - to contemporary comic books, graphic novels, film, manga, and video gaming, a growing number of Black women are becoming producers, viewersBlack Women in Sequence takes readers on a search for women of African descent in comics subculture. From the 1971 appearance of the Skywald Publications character "the Butterfly" - the first Black female superheroine in a comic book - to contemporary comic books, graphic novels, film, manga, and video gaming, a growing number of Black women are becoming producers, viewers, and subjects of sequential art.As the first detailed investigation of Black women's participation in comic art, Black Women in Sequence examines the representation, production, and transnational circulation of women of African descent in the sequential art world. In this groundbreaking study, which includes interviews with artists and writers, Deborah Whaley suggests that the treatment of the Black female subject in sequential art says much about the place of people of African descent in national ideology in the United States and abroad.For more information visit the author's website: http: //www.deborahelizabethwhaley.com/#!blac......

Title : Black Women in Sequence: Re-Inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime
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ISBN : 9780295994956
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Black Women in Sequence: Re-Inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime Reviews

  • Prima Seadiva
    2018-11-27 15:10

    I wanted to like this book so much more than I did. The subject of Black women in the arts, including comics and other graphic formats is most interesting and timely. The author takes a number of artists and genres and discusses both the positive role models they provide as well as the negative racist (and sexist) and invisibility implications. Sequence refers to the various art forms generally having an on going or sequential storyline.I found the author's writing style a real barrier for me. It seems as if written for doctorate thesis or purely an academic audience rather than general readers like myself. If you can plow through it without feeling like the talk is over your head half the time then I think you will enjoy the book more than I did. There are some illustrations. I wish there had been more though I realize that adds to the cost of a book. The author spent time describing lengthy scenes that I would have liked to also be able to see. It does help if you have some previous familiarity with the artists and characters.I was familiar with some of the works in the book-mostly the earlier such as Torchy Brown, Patti Jo and Ginger by Jackie Ormes, Catwoman as played by Eartha Kitt on the 60's t.v. Batman and also with the contemporary comic strip by Barbara Brandon-Croft "Where I'm Still Coming From". The author's analysis was therefore much easier to follow.I was very much less familiar with the superhero comics and the anime-manga genres as they are not genres I have read or viewed in general.Overall, she presents an important viewpoint. I just wish the writing had been more down to earth.

  • Mills College Library
    2018-11-30 17:02

    741.5973 W5525b 2016