Read Agnes Grey and Poems by Anne Brontë Online

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Agnes Grey is a governess, her charge the wealthy and beautiful Matilda. Possessed of an unshakeable sense of entitlement and a boundless sense of self-worth, assured of the adoration of all, Matilda can break men's hearts for fun. Agnes-diffident, careworn and poor-can only gape in astonishment at the figure her pupil cuts in the world. Employed to lead and form her, sheAgnes Grey is a governess, her charge the wealthy and beautiful Matilda. Possessed of an unshakeable sense of entitlement and a boundless sense of self-worth, assured of the adoration of all, Matilda can break men's hearts for fun. Agnes-diffident, careworn and poor-can only gape in astonishment at the figure her pupil cuts in the world. Employed to lead and form her, she is instead buffeted about in Matilda's tumultuous wake. She loves her young student-it is impossible not to. But it is hard not to wonder if Matilda's good fortunes will ever end....

Title : Agnes Grey and Poems
Author :
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ISBN : 9789350090107
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 50 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Agnes Grey and Poems Reviews

  • Margaret
    2019-03-24 03:28

    [2010] I haven't read this in years and had forgotten how much I like it. It's far more restrained than her sisters' novels, yet the treatment Agnes receives from her employers, the way they deny her equality and humanity because she's only a governess, is as horrifying in its own way as anything suffered by Charlotte's Jane Eyre. On this reading, I especially noticed also Anne's quiet wit, rather akin to Austen's, and her feeling for nature and the outdoors, akin to her sister Emily's.

  • Sarah
    2019-03-20 09:30

    I read this as a double duty: 1) I have a lot of reading time this summer, since apparently I'm a stay-at-home mom (aka unemployed) in a strange Southern "city," so I should spend at least some time reading Literature, and 2) if I fancy myself a to-be English professor I should probably read more exhaustively in my field. It turned out to be a pleasure. The only reason I took so long in reading it is because I realized on or about page 20 that I should take notes for reasons of academic interest (this hasn't happened in a long time). Agnes Grey is basically what you get if you squish together Fanny Price, Jane Eyre, and Emily Bronte the way you imagined her after reading Wuthering Heights at age 15 and being kind of skeeved by the wrecking-ball intensity of love. A governess who's both passionate and neurotic? Merchant Ivory, where are you? Anyway, the youngest Bronte turns out to be kind of awkward and amazing, like many of my favorite people. Tenant of Wildfell Hall, here I come!

  • Ervin Patrick
    2019-03-10 08:21

    Though considered a straightforward and an inferior novel in contrast to the novels of the author's sisters--Ms. Charlotte Bronte and Ms.Emily Bronte, the novel can be as deeply poignant and moving should the reader be able to put himself or herself in the shoes of the heroine. With its portrayal of a governess's role, one can think, especially those who are both future and present Educators, the weight of its message's relevance to the present day. The novel is indeed a manifestation that Education is not a facile course as most people regard it. The novel is a manifestation of perseverance itself and trust to God's graceful hands both portrayed by Agnes as a governess; indeed a novel with a tone of a curate's daughter and an effective--that is, persevere and kind--tutor.

  • Ksenia Shapshuk
    2019-03-11 07:39

    Simple-reading, make you relaxed and feel happy

  • Amarelys
    2019-02-28 07:32

    Hum, I'm sceptical. Is there a moral here, or is Agnes just a saint for being perfectly meek and putting up with the antics of a whole gallery of awful people? She also seems to be a terrible governess since she can barely make any change to the despicable characters and habits of her charges, and hardly improves their education. It just sounds like Anne is telling us that bad people will be bad and there's nothing at all to be done about that (as the poet said).The last couple of chapters brought in a bit of swoony romance, but this came a bit out of nowhere: Agnes had just been crushing on that guy from afar (view spoiler)[because he speaks well in church... (hide spoiler)], but never actually spoke to him. So how is HE suddenly in love with her? This part of the story, while vaguely enjoyable, seemed to have nothing to do with the first 80%; it seemed like a weird, contrived addition.I think I was seriously misguided by the summary on the back of my copy, which made Matilda stand out as Agnes's only charge and an essential character, while in fact she didn't show up until half the novel and was mostly a background character - they probably meant Rosalie...In her introduction, Anne Smith says "there is much more to Agnes Grey than immediately meets the eye"; if there is, it is quite hard to see...

  • Jon
    2019-03-09 03:21

    OMG. So bore. SO BORE.There are a couple of really great scenes, mostly with the various types of monstrous kids, but I found Agnes herself so uninteresting I just couldn't get invested, or engage with her various moralistic concerns and the revenge of the nerds style plot. You know the one where the plain introvert/governess wants to get with the popular kid at school/curate. Says nothing, but still beats the good looking jock/her student, and gets with the popular kid/curate while the jock/student goes on to be very unhappy/marry an abusive drunk and everyone cheers.