Read The Eye of the Fish by Luis H. Francia Online

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The first of Luis H. Francia's books of non-fiction to be published in the United States, The Eye of the Fish paints a vivid and detailed portrait of the terror, beauty and insistent humanity of the Philippines of today. Cross-cutting between Francia's recollections of the Philippines of his youth and accounts of his travels through the archipelago over the past two decadeThe first of Luis H. Francia's books of non-fiction to be published in the United States, The Eye of the Fish paints a vivid and detailed portrait of the terror, beauty and insistent humanity of the Philippines of today. Cross-cutting between Francia's recollections of the Philippines of his youth and accounts of his travels through the archipelago over the past two decades, The Eye of the Fish takes us the length of the nation: from Batanes in the north to the Muslim Jolo and Marawi regions of the south, and from the rugged mountain hideaways of revolutionary freedom fighters to the well-appointed salons of the political and cultural elite. Painters and priests, island shamans and small-town politicians, cultists, feminists and infamous first ladies all make an appearance in this imaginative and idiosyncratic exploration of 'home.' Through their stories, and through his own memories of estrangement and acceptance in the Philippines and in the U.S., Francia reflects on the hybridity that is simultaneously the burden and the benediction of the Philippines--and of his own mestizo self.LUIS H. FRANCIA's nonfiction works include the memoir Eye of the Fish: A Personal Archipelago, winner of both the 2002 Open Book Award and the 2002 Asian American Writers award, and Memories of Overdevelopment: Reviews and Essays of Two Decades. His A History of the Philippines: From Indios Bravos to Filipinos was published in 2010. He is in the Library of America's Becoming Americans: Four Centuries of Immigrant Writing. He is the editor of Brown River, White Ocean: A Twentieth Century Anthology of Philippine Literature in English, and co-editor of Vestiges of War: The Philippine-American War and the Aftermath of an Imperial Dream, 1899-1999, as well as the literary anthology, Flippin': Filipinos on America. His latest collection of nonfiction, RE: Reflections, Reviews, and Recollections, is being published by the University of Santo Thomas and will be released in 2014.Among his poetry collections are The Arctic Archipelago and Other Poems, Museum of Absences, and The Beauty of Ghosts. His poems have been included in numerous journals and anthologies, the latter including Returning a Borrowed Tongue, Language for a New Century, Field of Mirrors, and Love Rise Up! The University of the Philippines Press is publishing his next volume of poems, Tattered Boat, due out in the spring of 2014.In September 2012 Bindlestiff Studio in San Francisco gave his first full-length play The Strange Case of Citizen de la Cruz its world premiere.He has been a regular contributor to The Village Voice and The Nation, and was the New York correspondent for Asiaweek and The Far Eastern Economic Review. He teaches at New York University and Hunter College. He teaches creative writing at the City University of Hong Kong and writes an online column, -The Artist Abroad, - for Manila's Philippine Daily Inquirer....

Title : The Eye of the Fish
Author :
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ISBN : 9781885030313
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 392 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Eye of the Fish Reviews

  • Anna
    2019-04-30 19:17

    A lyrical exploration of the Philippine Islands, their histories, societies, economics, religions, and landscapes, this book manages the tricky balance of having a wide scope yet remaining deeply personal. Highly recommended.

  • Arah
    2019-05-26 18:07

    I read this in preparation for an upcoming trip to the Philippines, as recommended in a Lonely Planet reading list. I'm glad I did: Francia weaves together many stories in a very affable, rhythmic style with velocity and urgency that kept me turning the pages. It was surprisingly long, and yet by the end I was a little disappointed that there wasn't another island to visit, with yet more stories of his adventures and the people he met.About midway through the book, Francia reveals that he made some income briefly in the U.S. as a termpaper-writer for hire. This seemes rather gutsy for a writer to confess, though it serves his story well, both in the narrative at that point, and also as illustration of the resourcefulness he describes so well, in many of the people whose stories he shared. Well done.

  • Victoria
    2019-05-18 20:30

    I read this to understand the Philippines, a country I have recently spent some time in, in more depth, and it was a great choice. Francia explores every part of the Islands, taking you on a journey through well known and less well known places. Each story and person he meets combining to provide a lyrical and thorough exploration of this country and its unique mindset and problems, even the people he meets just briefly and who make up just one or two lines in the book add to this picture. Its rare to feel that you have glimpsed who it is to live in a country when you visit, and even rarer through a book, but this achieves it. A must-read for anyone planning to travel there.

  • baRbRa
    2019-05-02 22:32

    When I read this for class, I was immediately drawn into it - especially because of how it reminded me of my parents and our trips back to the Philippines. There's a prevalent feeling of change and loss, with such beautiful and vivid detail... It's a very moving memoir, but also a good account of history and the issues with hybrid identities. I was very excited to meet the author - even if he spelled my name wrong in my book.

  • Claire
    2019-04-27 15:34

    In my list of top 5 books... I first read it for an independent studies project w/ my professor Joy Harjo. I reread it last fall when I found out the author as going to be @ a Smithsonian event celebrating the centennial of Fil-Ams in the states. I was so excited I probably looked like a loser when I asked him to sign my copy. It'd be so cool if this became a staple of Asian-Am literature alongside Bulosan's work.

  • Joshua Steinberg
    2019-05-13 15:22

    This book was an interesting read, providing an in-depth history of the Philippines, and documents well the challenges facing the country. However, the author explains the impact and legacy of a colonial past too simplistically throughout the book.

  • Mary
    2019-05-14 21:18

    An excellent journey thorough the islands of the Philippines by a writer who got his start in pay-for-essay plagiarism schemes.

  • Roberto
    2019-04-26 19:25

    Good book to learn more about the communist struggle against the Marcos regime. It paints an interesting picture of an often-overlooked part of Filipino society.

  • Valery
    2019-04-27 21:11

    A powerful memoir of the history of American and Spanish Imperialism in the Philippines.