Read Greek Lyric, Volume V: The New School of Poetry and Anonymous Songs and Hymns by Anonymous David A. Campbell Online

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Towards the end of the fifth century B.C. Aristophanes and the other writers of comedy used contemporary poets and musicians as targets for their jokes, making fun of their innovations in language and music. The dithyrambs of Melanippides, Cinesias, Phrynis, Timotheus, and Philoxenus are remarkable examples of this new style. The poets of the new school, active from the miTowards the end of the fifth century B.C. Aristophanes and the other writers of comedy used contemporary poets and musicians as targets for their jokes, making fun of their innovations in language and music. The dithyrambs of Melanippides, Cinesias, Phrynis, Timotheus, and Philoxenus are remarkable examples of this new style. The poets of the new school, active from the mid-fifth to the mid-fourth century, are presented in this final volume of David Campbell's widely praised edition of Greek lyric poetry. The longest piece extant is a nome by Timotheus - the foremost of these poets - called The Persians; it is a florid account of the battle of Salamis, to be sung solo to cithara accompaniment. This volume also collects folk songs, drinking songs, and other anonymous pieces. The folk songs come from many parts of Greece and include children's ditties, marching songs, love songs, and snatches of cult poetry. The drinking songs are derived mainly from Athenaeus' collection of Attic scolia, short pieces performed at after-dinner drinking parties in Athens. The anonymous pieces come from papyrus, vases, and stone as well as from literary texts, and include hymns, narrative poetry, and satirical writing....

Title : Greek Lyric, Volume V: The New School of Poetry and Anonymous Songs and Hymns
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ISBN : 9780674995598
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 5 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Greek Lyric, Volume V: The New School of Poetry and Anonymous Songs and Hymns Reviews

  • John Cairns
    2018-12-28 22:52

    My first laugh was Pherecrates' verdict on Cinesias that 'he was bearable all the same: Phrynis on the other hand....' If Timotheus died between 366 and 356 BC he couldn't've been anywhere near the burning of Persepolis. He was so depressed at being laughed at by the audience he decided to take his own life but Euripides realised his greatness, comforted him with arguments and composed the prelude to The Persians for him. In Arcadia the boys are taught the traditional hymns and paeans first before going on to those of Philoxenus and Timotheus, contemporary music. There's quite a large chunk of the latter's Persians here, on Salamis, that won the prize and my one quibble would be his use of alimentary vessel for stomach, though that was the fashion and brings to mind 18th century English prosody . I like the story of Philoxenus at the court of Dionysius being so frank about the latter's bad poetry he was sent to the quarries. Subsequently on his return when asked by Dionysius what he thought of his poetry he summoned the attendants and told them to take him off to the quarries. His wit was appreciated. He went on to reassure his answers would be at once be true and please Dionysius who asked about his plays. Tragic, replied Philoxenus.

  • David
    2019-01-08 23:33

    Greek lyric is the beginning of the Greek poetry phase after Homer. Personally this is my favourite period so I will be biased. I love this bilingual version.