Read Strange Bedfellows: The Surprising Connection Between Sex, Evolution and Monogamy by David Philip Barash Judith Eve Lipton Online

strange-bedfellows-the-surprising-connection-between-sex-evolution-and-monogamy

In The Myth of Monogamy, husband and wife David P. Barash (an evolutionary biologist) and Judith Eve Lipton (a psychiatrist), stunned the public by showing how rare monogamy is in nature. Now, in Strange Bedfellows, they look at the other side of the coin: how biology actually promotes monogamy in some species and how these lessons apply to human beings. An accessible workIn The Myth of Monogamy, husband and wife David P. Barash (an evolutionary biologist) and Judith Eve Lipton (a psychiatrist), stunned the public by showing how rare monogamy is in nature. Now, in Strange Bedfellows, they look at the other side of the coin: how biology actually promotes monogamy in some species and how these lessons apply to human beings. An accessible work of science that is relevant to our intimate daily life, Strange Bedfellows will reassure some people, surprise others, and engage everyone. David P. Barash and Judith Eve Lipton have co-authored six books, including The Myth of Monogamy and Making Sense of Sex....

Title : Strange Bedfellows: The Surprising Connection Between Sex, Evolution and Monogamy
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781934137208
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 160 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Strange Bedfellows: The Surprising Connection Between Sex, Evolution and Monogamy Reviews

  • M. Sarki
    2018-12-13 05:03

    Interesting, and not at all what I expected. Useful, but somewhat lacking in its failure to deal with common deceit and the discussion needed between partners about adultery, which the authors recognize as most important in maintaining a monogamous relationship. It felt like Mr. Barash dropped the ball. Seems a good opportunity was wasted on things we already know and are willing to talk about. Rather get to the more dangerous topics regarding relationships and the jeopardy involved in bringing them to light.

  • João Martins
    2018-12-09 22:18

    Very disappointing...I've been reading a lot on nonmonogamy, including Barash & Liptons's previous book on it, which was very informative. I was expecting the same standard for this one, and really looking forward to seeing some solid biological (and otherwise) arguments for monogamy.The first third of the book does a very good job of recapping modern science's understanding of nonmonogamy (social and sexual) in the natural world.From then on, the authors make a fairly compelling argument.... that humans derive benefit from deep emotional bonds and twining their lives with other people. This is a great big strawman: the book is actually comparing lifelong partnerships to a sexually promiscuous bachelor lifestyle. This was significantly worsened by a lot of ambiguity regarding whether the authors are referring to sexual or social monogamy. As such, the book largely, though admittedly not completely, misrepresents nonmonogamy by excluding its arguably most relevant variant: deep emotional bonds and life twining with multiple people.In fact, a great portion - if not the vast majority - of their arguments becomes stronger when applied to deep emotional bonds with *multiple* people. I found many of their arguments to be fallacious, either logically or by "appeal to the poetic", which in our society is reduced to "appeal to tradition/status quo/(monogamous) commonsense". Admittedly, nonmonogamy books make liberal use the "appeal to the underdog" fallacy, so let's just say that evens out... As for specific arguments: raising children is logistically (and often emotionally) easier outside the single-parent or nuclear family unit (it takes a village...), which includes committed nonmonogamous relationships; and reciprocation or the social safety network is also stronger and more extended in nonmonogamy; the logistics "stuff" argument also holds better for multiple people.If their intent had not been made clear, it almost seems like the authors are arguing against the nuclear family, not for it...By the end of the book, the authors had almost ceased to relate to known science, and were instead making use of large leaps of faith in an attempt to connect the biology governing social animals with monogamy - and it frankly felt like they were grasping at straws.The most frustrating part of this read is that there is at least some science out there that has arguments for monogamy, as opposed to social nonmonogamy. It's known that some people simply cease to to develop significant romantic connections to others when already in a romantic relationship. This has been tied to certain hormones that suppress both desire and occurrence (sourced from somewhere in Deborah Annapol's book on polyamory).In the end, the book had a few interesting meta-observations that were well articulated, as well as a good quick review of evidence for nonmonogamy, for which it gets two stars. Truly, the most compelling argument for monogamy was a relatively brief mention of jealousy, left almost as an afterthought. If you are particularly inclined towards monogamy, this might help with feeling validated, though I found it to be a very lacking representation of the topic. Caveat: I'm much more inclined to nonmonogamy, both sexual and social, so bear that in mind.

  • Don Mitchell
    2018-11-19 00:12

    A rather awkward book to praise, but it's worthy of praise. Written by 2 scientists (evolutionary biologists?), it's an investigation into the pros and cons of monogamy. The authors are biased toward monogamy, but fairly and emphatically put out the lack of biological evidence before delving into the, on the other hand, evidence.They motivate personal choice monogamy (and other morals) through evidence about neural reinforcement learning, oxytocin (sic?) release, survival, and other scientifically supported ideas.I listened to this via audible.com. The narrator was a bit too maudlin or syrupy for my taste.Overall, I found the tour through species, hormonal, and neural science extremely intriguing in a very This American Life or Radio Lab way. The writing is very accessible.

  • Jenni
    2018-12-07 04:06

    Brilliant! After the many, many books I've read on the topic, this one ends up being the perfect finale to the others that have more dire predictions and conclusions on the subject of monogamy. This book acknowledges that Yes, monogamy is not natural to human beings, but what makes human beings unique is that we are able, if we are willing, to make a conscious and rational decision to "go against" our natural urges in order to live in more comfortable and agreeable terms with others and maybe even with ourselves. And that while it may not be an easy choice to make, doing so has more rewards and is worth the sacrifice.

  • Marrysparkle
    2018-12-17 02:05

    Strange Bedfellows is a intriguing and informative book about the ways in which humans defy our biological nature to mate with multiple people throughout our lives and how there are strong psychologically benefiting reasons for doing so. Given that the theory that we are all just genetically bent toward promiscuity is so well entrenched in collective mind of our society, the authors do a really great job at breaking this myth down to an elemental level in order to persuade us that this is not exactly true.

  • Mark
    2018-11-24 23:04

    Extremely interesting book and I enjoyed it tremendously. I'm stingy with my stars and it only barely missed getting 5 stars in my opinion. It takes a hard look at sexual relationships between humans with many examples of other species from a biological point of view. The author is pro monogamy but doesn't push her opinion to hard. She avoids all ethical or religious reasoning for a monogamous relationship and focuses on just biological reasons. Probably not a main stream book, but being a scientist myself I found it fascinating.

  • Galen
    2018-12-07 00:23

    Barash and Lipton make a good case that homo sapiens is adapted for both polygamy and monogamy (with occasional infidelity), like many other mammals and birds. They further argue that monogamy is a "good deal" and it is worth the sacrifices to try to make it work. The section on how to make it work could have been stronger. I'd like to see a marriage counseling self-help book that was informed by evolutionary psychology...

  • Daniela
    2018-11-23 06:25

    Maravilloso libro que desarrolla el tema de la monogamia en los hombres. Los autores hacen un estudio científico del comportamiento del hombre y aseguran que por naturaleza, el hombre no es monógamo pero que puede alcanzar ese estado gracias a la cooperación y a la razón.

  • Oriana
    2018-12-09 01:27

    Obvs not the kind of book I'd read if I wasn't being paid to do so, but quite good, I learned a lot of cool things about sexual practices in history & evolution.

  • Judith Eve
    2018-12-04 03:16