Read C'era due volte il barone Lamberto by Gianni Rodari Francesco Tullio Altan Online

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Il vecchio barone Lamberto, assai ricco e molto malato, vive con un maggiordomo in una villa sull'isola di San Giulio. Purtroppo deve fare i conti con un nipote avido e dei terribili banditi; senza contare uno stuolo di personaggi, di cui si circonda, impegnati a ripetere il suo nome, in modo da mantenerlo in vita... Il romanzo si snoda fra trovate divertenti, colpi di sceIl vecchio barone Lamberto, assai ricco e molto malato, vive con un maggiordomo in una villa sull'isola di San Giulio. Purtroppo deve fare i conti con un nipote avido e dei terribili banditi; senza contare uno stuolo di personaggi, di cui si circonda, impegnati a ripetere il suo nome, in modo da mantenerlo in vita... Il romanzo si snoda fra trovate divertenti, colpi di scena e situazioni paradossali....

Title : C'era due volte il barone Lamberto
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9788879262132
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 144 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

C'era due volte il barone Lamberto Reviews

  • Tyler Jones
    2018-11-20 08:34

    I have a theory that books are living things - or at least they are while they are being read. I believe it is the act of reading that creates meaning. True, without writing there would be nothing to read, but writing is like building a house - rather pointless if it is never lived in. A book is alive when read the way the house is alive when lived in. Could it be that the act of reading not only infuses the book with the force of life, but makes the reader more alive also?As we age we learn through trial and error ways of thinking that are best suited to advancing our place in society. Selecting one way of thought, of course, means rejecting others. I think this "rejection of the other" is not only a consequence of growing old, but also a cause of it: our increasingly inflexible minds find themselves slowly unable to comprehend a world that has changed since it has set itself. We no longer recognize the world. We feel old, increasingly out of touch, and accepting this we give our bodies permission to slowly fall to pieces.Aging, while it can not be reversed, can be significantly slowed if we find ways to combat the "rejection of the other" within our own minds. I believe this is best achieved by embarking on a rigorous and highly enjoyable regimen of reading fiction, most particularly fiction in which outlandish ideas are allowed their place in the sun. Such books (of which Lamberto Lamberto Lamberto is an excellent example) provide not only the "otherness" we have rejected, but an "otherness" of the highest quality - one that comes from a greater imagination than our own. Or mine own anyway.I take back my earlier statement that aging is irreversible; reading Lamberto Lamberto Lamberto will make you younger. As you read the cells of your skin will regain their lost elasticity. The wrinkles in your face will disappear and your bones will re-calcify. That mysterious pain in your abdomen that your doctor cannot explain will vanish. Friends will ask if you have been working out, or given up smoking, or taken to yoga. "No!" you will cry, "I've been reading Lamberto Lamberto Lamberto!"

  • Andrea
    2018-11-18 07:22

    Romanzo breve spassoso e originale.Il target a cui si rivolge non supera i dieci anni se letto in chiave letterale ma non per questo è meno bello. La storia che Rodari racconta non offre soltanto un divertimento serrato, una girandola di situazioni e personaggi esilaranti, ma anche un modo di leggere e interpretare il mondo, spesso grottesco, in cui viviamo.C'era due volte il barone Lamberto è una metafora sull'esistenza umana e sul rapporto tra la fama, la vita e la morte che lo stesso autore, nella prefazione del libro, spiega come un riferimento ad un detto dell'antica religione egiziana: "l'uomo il cui nome è detto resta in vita".Consigliatissimo!

  • Tze-Wen
    2018-11-12 10:16

    Immensely amusing, full of funny coincidences and surprising plot-twists, I never suffered a moment of dullness. The baron is a very likable fellow, who never complains about his many maladies, but matter-of-factly checks their symptoms and status with faithful manservant Anselmo instead. He is always cheerful, even the morning after his throat is slit (don't ask). Numbers are important in the story: there are 24 banks, 24 bank managers (plus their secretaries), 24 terrorists and somewhere down the line... 24 boy scouts. The name Lamberto must be recited three times in a row, repeatedly, before it has any impact. When Duilio the ferryman is sent out to buy five hundred yards of a certain gauge chain, the shop owner has to disappoint him but offers five hundred hammers, tongs, shovels, or whatever he wishes instead. There is something funny and magical about the repetition in numbers. I loved the seemingly effortless way in which the baron puts off the order for paying out his ransom. He purposefully sends confusing notes to his bank managers, written in a foreign language, so his captors won't see through his cleverness. The conversations between the 48 men and the decisions they reach are delightful to read. So are the representations of the international media and excitement-loving tourists, who are cooped up on top of surrounding mountains and ask ridiculous questions.True to a classic fairy tale, the bad - who are courteous though cruel-hearted - are punished in the end. Some form of justice is even found for the six Lamberto-chanters in the attic and it has something to do with circuses. The novella itself is entertaining enough, but the illustration truly does enhance the story. Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto is a fairytale suitable for - perhaps not very young - children, with moderate violence and modest romance. I would gladly read this magical tale again and again.

  • Danielle
    2018-12-10 09:25

    Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto by Gianni Rodari is an Italian children’s fable first published in 1978. At the beginning of the book we are introduced to Lamberto, a 93 year old Millionaire with over 24 life threatening ailments, and his loyal butler Mr. Anselmo. I enjoyed the connection these two characters had. You could tell from reading that Lamberto is a bit eccentric and that Anselmo is more straight lace and in a sense keeps Lamberto on his toes. As we go further into our reading we learn that after meeting with an Egyptian mystic Lamberto hires servants to recite his name nonstop, as he was told this would cure his illnesses. At first this work seems to be in vain, but as the story progresses we see Lamberto actually recovering from his illnesses. And before long he is up and moving as if he were never ill. Everything seems to be going well for Lamberto until his greedy nephew arrives and seems to bring a slew of trouble to his ailing uncle. I have to admit I enjoyed reading this story. It was hilarious and at times you find yourself actually identifying with Mr. Lamberto. If only having our names recited nonstop could cure illnesses, I believe every human being would hire over a hundred workers to say their name. Even though I loved Lamberto, my favorite character in this book has to be Mr. Anselmo. I love that he is so loyal to Mr. Lamberto and that he has his best interest in mind. We should all be so lucky to find a friend like Mr. Anselmo. Overall, this book was a joy to read and if you ever have time to sit back and enjoy a good read, I would definitely recommend this book.

  • Owen
    2018-11-29 05:29

    Baron Lamberto, 93, lives on an island in the middle of a lake, where he monitors his 24 banks while his butler Anselmo monitors his 24 illnesses. But when an Egyptian fakir's anti-aging advice turns out to actually work, the Baron's unexpected youth and vigor interfere with people's plans to get their hands on his money—the people being his nephew Ottavio, and a group of 24 terrorists who invade the island and take the Baron hostage.Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto is an old-fashioned fable told with modern trimmings, which makes it a little problematic in English. The details Rodari chooses to illuminate the story (the terrorists and their methods, the habits of the lakeside village, the class markers of the various characters) are all specific to Italy in the mid-'70s. If the setting were more obviously distant in space or time, or entirely invented, we could write it off as make-believe, but as it is it's close enough to the U.S. in 2012 that the American reader stumbles over what doesn't quite fit. This isn't Rodari's fault, of course, nor is it a problem with the translation; if anywhere, it's in the idea of publishing a translation that the mistake lies.Rodari is great and deserves to be read, but this may be one of those cases where translating the work out of its original context weakens it too much. Unfortunately, I think that might apply to most of Rodari's work; this book is actually his most-developed narrative and thus the one most likely to be able to stand on its own, and yet even it wobbles. Instead, everyone should just learn Italian, and study contemporary Italian history and society too. Then you'd get all of Rodari's jokes.

  • Claudia aka la viandante dei libri
    2018-12-09 07:12

    Il mito della vita eterna Letto quando ero una ragazzina. E riletto almeno altre tre volte. Per me leggere un libro significa filtrarlo attraverso le mie esperienze, le mie emozioni e i miei sentimenti. Quando di un libro mi ricordo il luogo dove l'ho letto, l'emozione che mi ha accompagnato, il desiderio di finirlo ma anche il dispiacere per questa fine significa che per me è un libro che mi ha dato qualcosa, che ha contribuito alla mia "educazione sentimentale". La semplicità della storia, la struttura narrativa che sostiene una certa ritmicità ma anche una continuità, l'ambientazione lo rendono un libro da rileggere per apprezzarne le sfumature di stile di un grande autore italiano del passato.

  • Roberta
    2018-11-25 10:34

    Sulle sponde del lago d'Orta si consuma, si fa per dire, un dramma: il barone Lamberto, ringiovanito grazie al consiglio di un santone egiziano, è messo in pericolo sia dal nipote che lo vuole morto per incassare l'eredità, sia da un manipolo di banditi che portano il suo stesso nome. Ottima fiaba per bambini con infiniti sottintesi per adulti. Il nipote Ottavio è gravato dai debiti di gioco (dei birilli) e del bere (gazose). Sindaco e negozianti sono felici del turismo in più che è stato portato dal sequestro del barone (e basta guardare un telegiornale dopo un qualche fatto cruento di cronaca per capire come questo turismo del macabro sia in espansione).Il lieto fine è d'obbligo. La lettura, anche.

  • Chris Schaeffer
    2018-12-13 10:16

    I've seen comparisons to Calvino pop up (and they're apt-- even Calvino himself praises the book's 'lightness,' a loaded term for Calvino, on the cover) but I kept thinking of the Boris Vian of 'L'ecume des jours' and 'Heartsnatchers,' or a much more buoyant Gellu Naum. Funny and strange, with one of the best final paragraphs in memory: "Any reader who is dissatisfied with the ending is free to change it to suit them, adding a chapter or two to this book. Or even thirteen. Never allow yourself to be frightened by the words."

  • VAle
    2018-11-17 08:26

    Uno dei miei libri preferiti da bambina, ho deciso di tentare la sorte (spesso la rilettura da grandi di ciò che si è amato da piccoli riserva brutte sorprese..) e rileggerlo: non me ne sono pentita! Magari ciò che ho amato un tempo non corrisponderà con ciò che ho amato in questa rilettura, ma Rodari incanta e diverte ancora!

  • Book Blogging Beauties
    2018-11-21 07:34

    http://bookbloggingbeauties.blogspot....Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto by Gianni Rodari is an Italian children’s fable first published in 1978. At the beginning of the book we are introduced to Lamberto, a 93 year old Millionaire with over 24 life threatening ailments, and his loyal butler Mr. Anselmo. I enjoyed the connection these two characters had. You could tell from reading that Lamberto is a bit eccentric and that Anselmo is more straight lace and in a sense keeps Lambertoon his toes. As we go further into our reading we learn that after meeting with an Egyptian mystic Lamberto hires servants to recite his name nonstop, as he was told this would cure his illnesses. At first this work seems to be in vain, but as the story progresses we see Lamberto actually recovering from his illnesses. And before long Lamberto is up and moving as if he were never ill. Everything seems to be going well for Lamberto until his greedy nephew arrives and seems to bring a slew of trouble to his ailing uncle. I have to admit I enjoyed reading this story. It was hilarious and at times you find yourself actually identifying with Mr. Lamberto. If only having our names recited nonstop could cure illnesses, I believe every human being would hire over a hundred workers to say their name. Even though I loved Lamberto, my favorite character in this book has to be Mr. Anselmo. I love that he is so loyal to Mr. Lamberto and that he has his best interest in mind. We should all be so lucky to find a friend like Mr. Anselmo. Overall, this book was a joy to read and if you ever have time to sit back and enjoy a good read, I would definitely recommend this book.

  • Shelly
    2018-12-13 08:26

    Baron Lamberto is ninety three years old and lives on the island of San Giulio in the middle of Lake Orta in the mountains of Northern Italy. Lamberto is very rich as he owns 24 banks around the world and on each continent and he is also very sick, having 24 ailments, one for each bank that he owns. Only his butler, Anselmo, remembers them all.Baron Lamberto is told by an Egyptian mystic that the secret to youthfulness is to have your name repeated over and over so he hires six people to chant his name twenty four hours a day. "Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto,...." Surprisingly, this works and Lamberto's health begins to improve and soon becomes the epitome of youth. But his life is at risk because not only does his only heir, his nephew Ottavio, want him to die but then a group of terrorists shows up at his castle to demand a ransom from each of his 24 banks. Soon the 24 bank managers arrive and negotiations begin. Lamberto Lamberto Lamberto was originally written in 1980 by Rodari and has been translated to English in 2011 by Anthony Shugaar. The original story is a great Italian Fable and Gianni Rodari (1920-1980) is a great Italian author and journalist most famous for his books for children. He won the Hans Christian Andersen award in 1970. I am extremely happy to have found this book in the new book section of my local library and to have read it and I highly recommend it to adults and children alike. It is filled with shenanigans, amusing characters, and is highly unpredictable.... I think you'll love it!

  • Kevin
    2018-11-30 07:14

    I am not real familiar with this works history - "one of Italy’s most beloved fables" - but something about it intrigued me.It turned out to be an easy read and rather witty in places but somewhat inexplicable as well - but fables often have this quality I suppose.What makes the story interesting is the blending of the all too believable with the incredible. The characters interact in humorous but totally believable and understandable ways. We recognize the stock type characters (dedicated butler, lazy but greedy nephew, board of directors and their secretaries, and the townspeople) and enjoy the humor of Lord Lamberto's new found youth.When the band of Lamberto's take over the island and issue their demands the story takes a turn toward the even more incredible and the ending has a twist I didn't see coming.But there is a surreal quality to it; and there was little resolution to the story - it just kind of ends. But in this way it reflects its connection to classic fables which often lack the tidy resolutions and clear messages we often produce today.An interesting and fun read but not something everyone would enjoy.

  • Elena
    2018-11-25 04:19

    What a great idea I had to buy this book! I sincerely admit that I did not know this writer, and I got it because I have found a review from one of my favourite writers of all time - Italo Calvino - right on top of the cover. This is a feel good book - it is a humorous fairytale for grown-ups, that could take place in our modern times. Lacking the pessimism characteristic to the surrealism genre, the book is a delight to read. I surprised myself several times laughing out loud. Federico Maggioni is the illustrator and I had to mention him here as I believe truly that nobody else could have captured better, in images,the story of Lamberto.It is a gem of a book, short, whimsical and with unexpected depth.

  • Eric Hinkle
    2018-12-02 05:27

    A truly zany and insaney little epic, full of hilarious absurdities, wander-full wordplay, and a love of detail. It's best read slowly, because there are so many little things that become hilarious if you hilarious. Like this: "I'll come downstairs immediately. In the meantime, offer those gentlemen some orangeade or a chamolile tea."The joke being, of course, that there can be no "meantime" if something is done immediately. Rodari is constantly stretching the literal sense of words beyond meaning and beyond belief, utterly assaulting the words and phrases to fit his desire. It's a fantastic pleasure. And I haven't even talked about the best things of the book. Get it!

  • Paul Oliver
    2018-11-22 07:08

    A charming cross between the works of Italo Calvino, Aesop, and Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto is a fable for all ages and easily my favorite book from our fall list. I know. You're not supposed to pick favorites.

  • Weronika Zimna
    2018-12-12 12:13

    This book is so much fun. Gianni Rodari is so much fun. Children's literature is so much fun. Whatever.

  • Damiana
    2018-11-19 11:29

    "Ricordati che l'uomo il cui nome è pronunciato resta in vita"

  • Stacia
    2018-11-22 04:09

    Delightfully wacky & weird, as all good fairy tales are. Falls in a category with Roald Dahl & Norton Juster, imo.

  • Elizabeth Scott
    2018-12-03 09:35

    It's funny, absurd and ultimately a wonderful children's book.

  • Lz Crbnel
    2018-11-30 09:27

    would love to read more unique stories like this!

  • Anne
    2018-11-14 12:29

    Very funny little fable. I just visited San Guilio in Lake Orta so that was fun, too.

  • LAPL Reads
    2018-12-07 09:08

    There is an ancient wise saying – almost a secret of the pharaohs – “The man whose name is spoken remains alive.”Twice upon a time there was an exceedingly elderly gentleman named Baron Lamberto, who lived in the villa on his private island of San Giulio in the middle of Lake Orta. Baron Lamberto had the greatest chamomile collection on our planet. He had chamomiles from the Alps and the Caucasus, the Sierras and the Andes, and even from the Himalayas. In addition, he had collections of umbrellas, seventeenth-century Dutch paintings, banks, mansions and two dozen life-threatening maladies. Only his trusted manservant, Anselmo, could remember all his illnesses, as he had cataloged them in alphabetical order. But alas…“Years will pass and centuries will go by before the light-blue waters of Lake Orta will see another funeral like Baron Lamberto’s – it was prettier than a color movie.” Finita la commedia? Look, Baron Lamberto’s trusted manservant is crying. Poor Anselmo! But softly, the coffin lid all of a sudden flips open and who springs out from it? Baron Lamberto!Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto is the English title of this unusual and magical book by Gianni Rodari. Weaving together humor, fantasy, fairy-tale, opera, mystery and a plethora of bold imagination, this novella will immensely amuse readers of all ages – whether thirteen or ninety-three. In fact, these numbers accompany Baron Lamberto at the end and at the beginning of the story respectively, because as the story unfolds, Baron Lamberto grows younger and younger. The secret? It is carefully woven into the interactions of characters and the unpredictable plot twists, as well as the historical/geographical peculiarity of Nigoglia – a rebellious river that marches to a different drummer – it runs uphill! It truly does so! If it ever happens that you find yourself in Omegna, Italy, where Lake Orta, the island of San Giulio and Baron Lamberto are located, stand for a moment in the Piazza del Municipio – the town hall – and you will see a river flowing out of Lake Orta that runs north towards the high Alps. And while the “mountains are still enveloped in a delicate blue haze,” you may even find an inscription on the town hall, which the people of Omegna have fished up as a motto for themselves. In their local dialect, it says: La Nigoja la va in su e la legg la fouma nu, which of course means: La Nigoglia runs uphill and we make our own laws.But, quietly, can you hear the sounds of Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations, echoing throughout the island of San Giulio? That’s Baron Lamberto playing the piano! Just a few weeks ago, he was an elderly gentleman, held up only “by his medicines and by his gold-pommeled walking sticks, and now look at him: a man in the prime of his life, almost a youngster.”And all this time, in the attic of his villa, a team of employees, day and night, continue repeating his name without knowing why: “Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto…”Time will pass, events will take place – events, worthy of a cinematic spectacle that will attract the attention of bankers and bandits, tourists and international media. Baron Lamberto’s age will drop from that of young man who has a “college degree to high school diploma,” and even further back. And there will come a day, when he will receive a special gift from one of his name chanters - signora Delfina – a gift that neither his personal bankers can give, nor his demanding bandits can take away. Reader, imagine Baron Lamberto becoming a trapeze artist, an acrobat, a juggler, a tightrope dancer, a lion tamer, an elephant trainer, a clown, a trumpeter, and a drummer. He’ll train seals, dogs, fleas, and dromedaries.“He’ll do this. He’ll do that. What will he do? No one can say yet.” But look, Delfina is smiling – she is happy for the gift she dreamed up for him.“Certain things happen only once,” writes Rodari in the epilogue. “And to tell the truth, certain things happen only in fairy tales.” Or, do they? “Always think with your own mind,” adds the author. And “never allow yourself to be frightened by the words: The End.”Reviewed by David Turshyan, Librarian, International Languages Department

  • Wythe Marschall
    2018-12-08 08:36

    Gianni Rodari's Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto (originally published as C’era due volte il barone Lamberto, translated from the Italian by Anthony Shugaar) is an illustrated fairytale novella ensconced firmly in the tradition of magical realism: The tri-titular Baron Lamberto keeps himself alive by paying six suckers to say his name, in shifts, smoothly, over and over again all day and night. This doesn't work for anyone else, just the Baron. Why? Who cares. Lamberto—incredibly rich, impossibly charming—has a scheming nephew who wants to kill him. The nephew tries but fails. Everyone goes home happy. Why? Who cares.Lamberto's undying hubris is punished by the otherwise-insignificant Delfina, one of the name-chanters, who says his name so rapidly that he reverts to early childhood. Why? Who cares. It's a fairytale (we're even told this by the narrator), so logic hardly matters. Anything can happen, and many things that happen here are quite humorous.Everything is exquisitely, inchoately illustrated in droopy, Steadman-esque ink by Federico Maggioni, and this adds much to the fairytale quality of the whole. Melville House, as always, produces a splendid graphic presentation, and the choice to publish Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto reinforces their welcome commitment to a diversity of literary genres and inter-genres—to books that poke across traditional market boundaries of audience.But Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto owes more to Calvino and the "magic" of the Old World than to the adepts of neo-magical realism—the infinitely entertaining César Aira foremost among them. The newer breed of writer-magician turns away from conventions such as immortality, the magic power of names, evil bankers, and nobility (barons), instead finding literalized magic in everyday modern elements: Aira's ice cream, in How I Became a Nun, or the paradoxically banal/Lovecraftian geometries hidden in the highlands of Chile and Argentina, in his An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter.Rodari is a first-rate storyteller, and this is a swift, pleasurable, twee read. But it does not linger in the unconscious the way that Calvino's tales or Aira's miniature novels do. The fault is not in the prose and definitely not in the kinetic illustrations. The disappearing nature of the book lies in its insistence that we root for a corrupt noble, I think (though this could be a too-simple Marxian reading). Why root for Lamberto? Why not delight in his anti-demise, his Benjamin-Buttoning? I have no answer.

  • Angela
    2018-11-22 04:37

    This tale is wacky and strange. It has a flare of the fairy tale to it, but also the feel of an allegory. In the end, though, I wasn’t sure what I was supposed to get out of it.Lamberto’s health is fading in his old age, so he hires four people to take turns reciting his name all day, every day. According to an Egyptian mystic, his name being spoken will keep him alive. It works. By the time his greedy nephew shows up to help usher his uncle into the next life and collect the family fortune, Lamberto looks better than him.Then there are bandits trying to take over Lamberto’s fortune, and they’re all named Lamberto. And then the presidents of Lamberto’s 24 banks show up with their 24 secretaries.I’m guessing there’s some satire here, but as my Italian knowledge is limited to the boot-shaped country where pasta was born, it went over my head. For the most part, I found the storytelling repetitious and slow. In trying to be delightful, it achieved being childish. In the course of this extremely short volume, I considered giving up several times. I had no purpose to continue. I didn’t care about Lamberto, his nephew, the people repeating the name, any of the bandits, bankers, or secretaries, or any of the approximately one-thousand irrelevant details about any of them.Since this is an English translation of an Italian fable (one of Italy’s most beloved fables at that), this edition should have included some context in a forward or afterword for its non-Italian audience. Also, it’s not a fable. I’m fairly certain the right people knew that, so there must be some meaning in referring to it as a fable. But again, all I have is the text. I think I would have gotten much more out of it if the story had been accompanied by an article or two about the story and how it came to be.• Content is appropriate for a young audience

  • Julie - Book Hooked Blog
    2018-12-08 07:19

    Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto is an Italian fable that has been popular in the country for years. It is the story of an old man, Lamberto, who discovers the secret to life is having his name spoken repeatedly. He hires a team of employees to constantly speak his name and quickly rediscovers his youth and vitality. But his nephew, eager to inherit his fortune, wants to discover his secret. Not only that, but his island villa is taken hostage by a team of terrorists with bizarre demands.WritingIt's really hard for me to evaluate the writing of a work in translation when I don't speak the original language the book was written in. I feel like it's difficult to say whether or not Rodari was a good author when I'm actually evaluating the translation (in this case, done by Antony Shugaar). Regardless of that hesitation however, this edition of the book is charming. There weren't moments of awkward language use or portions that were difficult to understand, so the translation was obviously done well. And I was thoroughly impressed by the intricacy of the story.Entertainment ValueAdorable. It's pretty short and has precious illustrations, so it won't take you long to read. I read it in just a couple of hours during breaks at work. It's an interesting story and, with all the new imaginings of fairytales that are so popular right now, I think this one fits right in. It's a take on fable-telling that I haven't heard before, with that "universal truth" feeling behind it, but with a more modern take. OverallI recommend giving it a try, especially if you're into children's literature or fables or are enjoying all of the current updated fairytale stories.

  • Laura
    2018-11-28 10:21

    This is a sweet and, as one of my fellow book-club babes said, playful book. It's a fairy tale with a great sense of humor (reminiscent of James Thurber's Many Moons) and even though it's most likely geared for late elementary school readers, it's a boatload of fun for readers of any age. It only took me about two train commutes to get through, and since some of the book's Italian townspeople have particular feelings about the unreliability of train riders (they tell tall tales because there's no way to check their facts on the train [the book pre-dates smart phones]), I felt I was reading it in the perfect context.Although the ending and the "moral" were both a bit clunky (I have a sense it was not because of the translation, which was very strong throughout, but because of the writing of Rodari himself), overall it was a satisfyingly silly read.

  • Moonie Jarl
    2018-12-10 09:22

    Je ne sais pas si je devrais dire que Gianni Rodari est le Roald Dahl italien ou que Roald Dahl est le Gianni Rodari anglais... Ce serait un compliment dans les deux cas! On retrouve ici le style soigné et le penchant pour l'absurde de l'auteur qui ne fait que confirmer (s'il en était besoin) ses talents de conteurs. Au point qu'à la lecture, je me suis dit que j'apprécierais sans doute plus encore d'écouter quelqu'un me raconter l'histoire de cet homme qui a trouvé une cure de jouvence aux effets incontrôlables et qui semble marqué par le chiffre 24. Personne n'est épargné, pas même le personnage principal. C'est burlesque, rondement mené, un vrai feu d'artifice!http://matildaaliceetlerenard.blog.com/

  • Jane
    2018-11-17 09:19

    Fun Fun Fun. At 93 Baron Lamberto is afflicted with as many ailments as he has banks. He discovers from an Egyptian fakir that he can live longer if his name is repeated over and over and over. He hires 6 people to live in his attic to do just that and discovers that he is, to his surprise, becoming younger and younger. His nephew is waiting for him to die believing he will inherit his uncle's fotune so he can pay his many debts. Then 24 Lambertos arrive to also take some of that fortune by force. The crowd gathers, reporters and photgraphers flock to the scene - and to negotiate with the bandits the 24 presidents of his 24 banks arrive with their 24 secretarys. Short and funny - a fairy tale for adults.

  • Scotchneat
    2018-11-20 07:14

    Originally written in the 70's when the Red Brigades were being dickheads in Italy, this book was just recently translated and released here.It's a fable? Fairy tale? Amusing story in any case. Lamberto is a 93 YO millionaire who owns his own island, 24 banks and more than a handful of ailments. He gets the inside scoop in Egypt on how to get better and hires 6 people to chant his name 24/7.Magically, he not only gets better, he gets younger. But then some namesake terrorists take over his island and hold him ransom, and things get a little absurd after that.Even without the context needed to fully get the satire, it was absurd enough to be entertaining.

  • Temperamente
    2018-11-30 11:21

    «Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto…» ripetono, dalla mattina alla sera, le sei persone assunte dal ricco e anziano barone Lamberto, con l’unico scopo di pronunciare il suo nome. Che stranezza è mai questa? L’uomo il cui nome è detto resta in vita, recita un antico proverbio egiziano, che il barone ha preso davvero alla lettera. L’esperimento, però, sembra funzionare! Il barone ringiovanisce, ringiovanisce, fino a rinascere.Continua a leggere: http://www.temperamente.it/ragazzi/c%...