Read The Open Question: A Tale of Two Temperaments by Elizabeth Robins Online

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Elizabeth Robins (1862-1952) was an actress, playwright, novelist, and suffragist. In 1885, she married actor George Richmond Parks. Although her husband struggled to get parts, her own acting career gained momentum and she was soon in great demand. Approaching the age of 40, Robins realized her income from acting was not stable enough to carry her through her later years.Elizabeth Robins (1862-1952) was an actress, playwright, novelist, and suffragist. In 1885, she married actor George Richmond Parks. Although her husband struggled to get parts, her own acting career gained momentum and she was soon in great demand. Approaching the age of 40, Robins realized her income from acting was not stable enough to carry her through her later years. An able writer, she turned to the pen, publishing a number of well-received novels under the pseudonym C. E. Raimond. She became a member of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies and Women's Social and Political Union. She remained a strong advocate of women's rights and used her gifts as a public speaker and writer on behalf of the cause. Her works include: Below the Salt (1896), The Open Question: A Tale of Two Temperaments (1898), Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts (1906), The Convert (1907), Under the Southern Cross (1907), The Mills of the Gods (1908), Way Stations (1913), My Little Sister (1913), Camilla (1918), The Messenger (1919) and Theatre and Friendship (1932)....

Title : The Open Question: A Tale of Two Temperaments
Author :
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ISBN : 9781409982074
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 556 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Open Question: A Tale of Two Temperaments Reviews

  • Ian Smith
    2018-12-05 10:41

    A somewhat obscure book perhaps. Written in 1898 by Elizabeth Robins as a contemporary tale of a dynasty and a house divided by its past and present; north-south, black-white, rich-poor, male-female, passionate-phlegmatic, faith-unbelief. Each brace providing the author with an opportunity to explore the riches of relationships that thrive on conflict. Perhaps this why she subtitles the book 'A tale of two temperaments'. Slow in pace, complex in language, simple in concept, profound in thought, this is a book that is more easily started than finished. Indeed, I nearly gave up about a third of the way in. I'm glad I persevered. I chose to read it because my grandfather did so during the first world war. Private Walter Jordan, fighting in the trenches of France, came across this book, and having read it, recommended it to his cousin, Hilda. It was the only book he ever mentioned in a copious correspondence of 40 letters written to her over five years of war. The profound significance of his recommendation is now clear to me. For the core of this great story is the agony and joy of two young cousins, deeply in love with one another, who face the frank opposition of their family. And this was the fate that befell my grandfather. For he too was deeply in love with his cousin, Hilda. And she with him. Wonderfully, they waited patiently until their families finally came to accept the inevitability of their relationship, and they were finally married in 1931, some 20 years after they first fell in love. So for me a book well worth reading. For others, I cannot be so sure.UPDATE. I managed to find an 1899 copy of the book on eBay and discovered that the KIndle version (which is the Gutenberg version) astonishingly lacks the last five sentences of the book! Presumably the transcriber felt that the book finished better with the words of Val; "It will bring us out at the Golden Gate," she said.I can now reveal the true ending!'It will bring us out at the Golden Gate,' she said.Yaffti seemed to draw a long joyous breath; the white sail bellied in the warm wind.'Good-bye,' Val called back across the water.'Good-bye, ma'am.'Sam Cornish filled his pipe. He watched Yaffti drop down the bay, and sail away into the sunset. THE END