Read Food Will Win the War: Minnesota Crops, Cooks, and Conservation during World War I by Rae Katherine Eighmey Online

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Meatless Mondays, Wheatless Wednesdays, vegetable gardens and chickens in every empty lot. When the United States entered World War I, Minnesotans responded to appeals for personal sacrifice and changed the way they cooked and ate in order to conserve food for the boys “over there.” Baking with corn and rye, eating simple meals based on locally grown food, consuming fewerMeatless Mondays, Wheatless Wednesdays, vegetable gardens and chickens in every empty lot. When the United States entered World War I, Minnesotans responded to appeals for personal sacrifice and changed the way they cooked and ate in order to conserve food for the boys “over there.” Baking with corn and rye, eating simple meals based on locally grown food, consuming fewer calories, and wasting nothing in the kitchen became civic acts. High-energy foods and calories unconsumed on the American home front could help the food-starved, war-torn American Allies eat another day and fight another battle.Food historian Rae Katherine Eighmey engages readers with wide research and recipes drawn from rarely viewed letters, diaries, recipe books, newspaper accounts, government pamphlets, and public service fliers. She brings alive the unknown but unparalleled efforts to win the war made by ordinary “Citizen Soldiers”—farmers and city dwellers, lumberjacks and homemakers—who rolled up their sleeves to apply “can-do” ingenuity coupled with “must-do” drive. Their remarkable efforts transformed everyday life and set the stage for the United States’ postwar economic and political ascendance.Rae Katherine Eighmey is a food historian who has written several historical recipe books and coauthored Potluck Paradise: Favorite Fare from Church and Community Cookbooks. An avid foodie, she tested all the recipes in this book for modern kitchens....

Title : Food Will Win the War: Minnesota Crops, Cooks, and Conservation during World War I
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780873517188
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Food Will Win the War: Minnesota Crops, Cooks, and Conservation during World War I Reviews

  • Fredrick Danysh
    2019-05-18 09:28

    Chronicles the food conservation efforts in the United States during World War I, especially in Minnesota. Numerious period illustrations and recipes.

  • Caitlin O'Sullivan
    2019-05-10 09:45

    Sometimes a bit dry and repetitive, but generally a comprehensive and interesting look into food-related domestic culture in the US during WWI. Amply illustrated with patriotic posters and recipes as well as snippets of wartime correspondence between the home front and the front lines. Of great value to writers and researchers interested in the era, as well as WWI buffs looking at the day-to-day civilian experience in the US.

  • Annie
    2019-05-23 05:51

    What a fun historical read! This book chronicles the World War I years through the lens of food conservation in Minnesota. Does that sound a tad boring? It is decidedly not. Not only is this book a fascinating read, it is also filled with posters, letters, photographs, and conservation recipies. You will also get a fantastic glimpse into what civic life was like in MN during the war years. A joy to read from beginning to end, I highly recommend this book.

  • Melissa
    2019-05-15 09:38

    great information on how wwi affected food supplies. lots of recipes to consider trying. a great read!

  • Stacy
    2019-05-02 08:26

    When government get involved in food the results can last a least a hundred years. Interesting to see the lasting affects of WWI and take a closer look into the lives of our ancestors.

  • Amy
    2019-05-24 09:36

    I absolutely love the focus of the book, but the writing was dry and did not hold my interest. I skimmed to get the gist of it, but I wish it hadn't been so boring.