Read The Message in the Hollow Oak by Carolyn Keene Online

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Nancy Drew determines if an ivory elephant charm really protects its wearer from harm when she investigates the involvement of a member of the Bengleton Wild-Animal Show in a mysterious scheme....

Title : The Message in the Hollow Oak
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781101077139
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Message in the Hollow Oak Reviews

  • Sheila
    2018-12-12 14:45

    I give this a 3-star review, just because my daughter so enjoys being read these Nancy Drew stories. For me, the plots are SO unrealistic. Someone gets kidnapped in almost every single Nancy Drew book! Including this one! Two separate people were in fact kidnapped in this one. Yet both were found unharmed and saved by Nancy. And car accidents. Almost every book Nancy gets in a car accident. Including in this one. Yet she always walks away fine, with either no damage to the car, or just minor damage. This book is set at an archaeological dig, and I was disappointed in the student's treatment of the skeletal remains that they found. They seemed to be shown off as "trophies", which bones being taken into a barn and wired together by the students to make hanging skeletons. No respect was shown for the remains. And I feel sorry for Bess (Nancy's friend). She is always described by her weight: "Bess was a slightly plump blond with delightful dimples." And there are always scenes with her involving food, such as in this book when their food gets stolen out of their vehicle by some children, and "Bess sat down on the ground, disconsolate." and her cousin George makes fun of her telling her "It wouldn't hurt you to go without a meal." Why do they always have to focus on her weight and make fun of her eating?

  • Deanna
    2018-12-16 12:32

    Whether or not you know anything about the different versions of Nancy Drew books, the books printed after 1959 are revised versions from the original Nancy Drew books. Only two of the original Nancy Drew books were totally rewritten when they were revised. This book is one of them. The other is The Secret of Shadow Ranch. I recommend reading both versions as the reader gets a better idea of how the original was written and how the revised version is different.

  • Ann♥♪♪♪♪
    2018-12-16 16:38

    Revised edition (haven't read original). Grave robbing. Hated it - Nancy Drew and the other regular characters wouldn't do that. She and the others would have said it was wrong. I like archaeology such as exploring and searching places that aren't burial grounds. Desecrating graves is despicable as well as disrespectful. Forget this book if you want to read Nancy Drew - there are so many great Nancy Drew books you could read instead.

  • John Yelverton
    2018-12-18 18:33

    Very dark and mysterious Nancy Drew novel. This series is so much fun, because no two books are the same.

  • Milley
    2018-11-27 17:44

    it turns out i actually did read the original and i do remember it being a lot more exciting.

  • Whitney
    2018-11-25 18:53

    Archeology project! At this point, some weeks after finishing, I forget the precise mystery. I only remember the awkward social situation Nancy endures amongst the students who are involved in this "dig" for Native American artifacts, skeletons, etc.Here's the sitch: One of the students, whose name is "Art" is apparently a cool guy because he owns a motorcycle. He seems sweet on Nancy, and she enjoys his helpful offers to drive her to the closest town so she can make phone calls. But of course she cannot date him because Ned Nickerson wouldn't like it. And she also has no desire to date Art, because most likely Art is a real drip. Luckily Nancy passes him on to one of the other girl students involved in the dig. Hooray!And maybe twice the group has a campfire/picnic shindig. Steaks. Always steaks in these books.The mystery, as my memory somewhat activates, is a hidden treasure. But it's a separate item from the dig, which looks for skeletons. Someone thinks they found a baby skeleton but no one stops to think about whether this is a gravesite, whether it should be respected, etc. Nope! Just keep digging. Nothing bad ever happens when Native American gravesites are desecrated. It doesn't matter, right?? >:-(

  • Josiah
    2018-11-24 13:39

    Very good book! I think it was cool to see them dig up burial grounds and find treasure. I would recommend to all mystery and adventure lovers!!!

  • Judy
    2018-12-09 15:36

    Every Nancy Drew mystery brings me back to grade school... Just waxing nostalgic last week. :). One of the better Nancy Drews I've read because Ned Nickerson joined the adventure. But I do hope I also get to read the original story someday. I wonder why they changed it?

  • Danielle
    2018-11-20 19:48

    This was a tedious story. The mystery(s) were choppy and pretty far fetched. Kadle was crazy obsessed with finding the treasure, yet he didn't find these two massive oaks with big lumps on them? He instead chops a newer oak into a mess? He decides to hire two thugs to harass Nancy and the archaeology crew? Please. The constant barraging of thieves at the dig site was not interesting, even with the walking skeleton. All that driving back and forth from the farmhouse to the town to make phone calls. And don't even get me started on the 'love triangle'! Ridiculous and unnecessary. Oh, here Art. Stand next to Julie Anne a couple of times so that you will like her more than Nancy. Then Bess and Nancy give each other a wink and a smile. Gah! Additionally, as a fan of archaeology, I was sickened to see how anyone could just pick up a shovel and dig. Yes, I understand that this was a fiction novel. But the lack of order and methodical work on the site with the tiresome mystery storyline just killed the book for me. The ONLY reason I finished the book was because I was reading it to my 5-year old and I didn't want her to give up easily. I would have tossed the book 3 chapters in.

  • Hannah
    2018-11-26 19:56

    I read a new printing of this book. I was at a used bookstore one day and saw it with a different cover. I opened it up, to my surprise the only thing the same between the old and the new was the title. The older 1932 copy is a lot better, it's more exciting.

  • Ruthie Jones
    2018-12-16 19:45

    I read all the Nancy Drew books (and the Hardy Boys) when I was a child, but I will admit that I have read them all again as an adult (a few years ago). The stories are old fashioned, but that's why I like them so much.

  • Jerry
    2018-11-19 19:40

    Standard fare for this series...which isn't a bad thing.

  • Robin_R
    2018-12-11 18:45

    Fun to re-read these childhood favorites!

  • Lauren Alise Schultz
    2018-12-10 19:52

    These are just my notes *MAJOR SPOILERS* on the differences between the old (1930s) and new (1970s) versions of the novel. I haven't attempted to write an actual review at this point.In the older version, Nancy, Bess and George are in a great train wreck on the way to survey some land in Canada which Nancy has unrealistically won from a radio contest. Before the accident, Nancy meets a famous Hollywood script writer and novelist on the train and ends up reuniting her with both her estranged Grandfather and her former fiance. The Hollow Oak tree is an old tree on Grandfather Pierre Chap's property, where Annette Chap and her fiance had once hidden messages for each other. Other adventures in the novel include when a man tries to steal the deed to Nancy's land, which is apparently wanted by several parties because gold has been found on the property. Bess almost dies while sleep walking, but Nancy lassoes her to save her. Those ranch hand skills from The Secret of Shadow Ranch are coming in handy again! Nancy's father is able to clear up a number of frauds that are all tied to one of his own cases, and the by uncovering all the details about the swindler, Carson Drew helps Nancy clear up a family feud between two families, the Rannys and the Donnellys. In the end, Nancy steals back a whole bag of gold nuggets that have been prospected from her property and dynamites the dam on her property so that the crooks can't get any more gold off the land. Quite an adventure in Canada!In the newer version, Nancy is summoned to New York by her Aunt Eloise, to meet her detective friend Boyce Osborne. Both are entirely new characters to the story. Osborne asks her to help solve a mystery in Illinois, not Canada. There's no mention of Nancy winning property, so apparently the author of the rewrite thought that was just as implausible as I thought it was. Nancy gets stuck in an elevator at Aunt Eloise's apartment building, a far less traumatic adventure than being involved with a train wreck. Nancy ends up staying with some college girls from an archeological dig, under the supervision of Theresa Bancroft, instead of her guardian Mrs. Donnelly in the original novel. I guess an archeological dig seemed a little more tame/realistic for Nancy to join, as opposed to the mining camp in the first novel. Ned makes an appearance in order to facilitate Nancy's introduction to the archeological dig, reminding us all that Nancy Drew has a boyfriend. Nancy ends up in Saint Louis for some reason, before going on to the dig. Is this another fabulous case of cultural tourism from the Nancy Drew novels? In this version of the mystery, Grandfather Pierre Chap, the estranged grandfather of the Hollywood authoress Annette Chap, has become a French missionary from Canada named Pierre Francois. He has hidden a message in the Hollow Oak tree, so it seems that the new version of the story has eliminated the former lovers that were broken up by the grandfather. The list of changes goes on. Plane travel instead of train travel makes sense. But Raymond Niles, the man who tried to steal the deed to Nancy's property in the original novel, becomes the "confidence man" Kit Kadle. It seems as though the author of the second version was absolutely determined to completely gut and change this novel. There is, in fact, a whole new cast of characters, including Need Nickerson's cousin, and Nancy's whole gang including George, Bess, Ned, Burt, and Dave all join her at the archeological dig to search for pirate treasure. And instead of the scenario about Annette Chap's marriage being thwarted when someone left a false note in the Hollow Oak, there is quite a bit of drama when a young man named Art takes a liking to Nancy, jealousy develops between Need and Art, and then Bess decides to get involved. To round out the drama, there is also an annoying know-it-all amongst the girls at the dig. So despite the feminist leanings of the 1950s Nancy Drew's, the author is still encouraging a pretty view of some women amongst themselves. Instead of Bess's sleepwalking adventure, George falls into the water and is almost crushed by a barge, so at least the novel isn't entirely devoid of exciting, traumatic events. And at one point, a car overturns in a river, and a second car crash involves a truck running fully inside of an abandoned building. These two accidents are still a somewhat poor substitute for the train wreck at the beginning of the original novel, but both events are much more exciting than the stalled elevator incident. And there is still a kidnapping and rescue in both the original and revised version of the novel.

  • Stef
    2018-11-19 12:47

    UGH. Impressively boring, even for a Nancy Drew story. It shouldn't take more than a day to read one of these books, let alone nearly a month, but I was never excited to pick it up once I put it down. Nancy is in Ohio (I think?) hanging out with a bunch of college students who're on an archaeology dig, scrounging up "ancient Indian" artifacts. She's looking for a treasure hidden in a hollow oak tree by following metal plates nailed to other oak trees, and of course a selfish baddie is scrambling to find the treasure as well and is making Nancy's life a hell. Someone even gets kidnapped! Someone else waves a gun around for a nearly half a page before the police barge in and the villain divulges every last detail very Scooby-Doobly. A dude is jealous of Ned, Nancy's Ken doll of a boyfriend, but for all the perplexing strife it causes Nancy, it goes nowhere and remains unresolved.

  • Shela Muriel
    2018-12-02 17:41

    This book was interesting and intense in my opinion that is. Nancy is always solving those mysteries while getting herself caught in scary situations. The only thing I do hate even though I believe everyone would hate the antagonist, was Kit Kadle. And when Nancy found that box and open it. I believe that Kit would be fairly disappointed, seeing as it's actually not a box full of gold but just some very valuable artifacts. As always foiled again by Nancy Drew the great detective. No one will ever get in her way or even scare her away she is the best and most bravest detective ever. (Aside from Sherlock holmes that is)

  • Sherri
    2018-11-26 16:49

    Nancy Drew and friends set out to solve an impossible-seeming mystery, one that is 300 years old. How can there still be clues to follow? Seems unrealistic, but that is explained by the fact that oak trees can live to be centuries old. As usual, this mystery is fraught with danger, and the crooks are determined to have the treasure - at any cost!I don't remember reading this as a child, so I read this with fresh eyes. I can imagine that as a child I would have been spooked by the idea of an old native burial ground and kidnappings. Great for young people.

  • Lauren
    2018-12-19 16:43

    Enjoyable book for young girls.

  • Margie
    2018-11-27 11:27

    A great, suspenseful mystery adventure with Nancy and her friends!

  • IrishFan
    2018-11-30 15:41

    I do not remember this one from when I was little. I am enjoying reading these, especially the ones I don't quite recall.

  • Macey Austin
    2018-11-30 13:57

    You can’t go wrong with some classic Nancy Drew!

  • Reaganloveread
    2018-11-23 19:56

    Alice never think before doing something

  • Lauren Alise Schultz
    2018-11-30 11:51

    **spoiler alert** These are just my notes *MAJOR SPOILERS* on the differences between the old (1930s) and new (1970s) versions of the novel. I haven't attempted to write an actual review at this point.In the older version, Nancy, Bess and George are in a great train wreck on the way to survey some land in Canada which Nancy has unrealistically won from a radio contest. Before the accident, Nancy meets a famous Hollywood script writer and novelist on the train and ends up reuniting her with both her estranged Grandfather and her former fiance. The Hollow Oak tree is an old tree on Grandfather Pierre Chap's property, where Annette Chap and her fiance had once hidden messages for each other. Other adventures in the novel include when a man tries to steal the deed to Nancy's land, which is apparently wanted by several prties because gold has been found on the property. Bess almost dies while sleep walking, but Nancy lassoes her to save her. Those ranch hand skills from The Secret of Shadow Ranch are coming in handy again! Nancy's father is able to clear up a number of frauds that are all tied to one of his own cases, and the by uncovering all the details about the swindler, Carson Drew helps Nancy clear up a family feud between two families, the Rannys and the Donnellys. In the end, Nancy steals back a whole bag of gold nuggets that have been prospected from her property and dynamites the dam on her property so that the crooks can't get any more gold off the land. Quite an adventure in Canada!In the newer version, Nancy is summoned to New York by her Aunt Eloise, to meet her detective friend Boyce Osborne. Both are entirely new characters to the story. Osborne asks her to help solve a mystery in Illinois, not Canada. There's no mention of Nancy winning property, so apparently the author of the rewrite thought that was just as implausible as I thought it was. Nancy gets stuck in an elevator at Aunt Eloise's apartment building, a far less traumatic adventure than being involved with a train wreck. Nancy ends up staying with some college girls from an archeological dig, under the supervision of Theresa Bancroft, instead of her guardian Mrs. Donnelly in the original novel. I guess an archeological dig seemed a little more tame/realistic for Nancy to join, as opposed to the mining camp in the first novel. Ned makes an appearance in order to facilitate Nancy's introduction to the archeological dig, reminding us all that Nancy Drew has a boyfriend. Nancy ends up in Saint Louis for some reason, before going on to the dig. Is this another fabulous case of cultural tourism from the Nancy Drew novels? In this version of the mystery, Grandfather Pierre Chap, the estranged grandfather of the Hollywood authoress Annette Chap, has become a French missionary from Canada named Pierre Francois. He has hidden a message in the Hollow Oak tree, so it seems that the new version of the story has eliminated the former lovers that were broken up by the grandfather. The list of changes goes on. Plane travel instead of train travel makes sense. But Raymond Niles, the man who tried to steal the deed to Nancy's property in the original novel, becomes the "confidence man" Kit Kadle. It seems as though the author of the second version was absolutely determined to completely gut and change this novel. There is, in fact, a whole new cast of characters, including Need Nickerson's cousin, and Nancy's whole gang including George, Bess, Ned, Burt, and Dave all join her at the archeological dig to search for pirate treasure. And instead of the scenario about Annette Chap's marriage being thwarted when someone left a false note in the Hollow Oak, there is quite a bit of drama when a young man named Art takes a liking to Nancy, jealousy develops between Need and Art, and then Bess decides to get involved. To round out the drama, there is also an annoying know-it-all amongst the girls at the dig. So despite the feminist leanings of the 1950s Nancy Drew's, the author is still encouraging a pretty view of some women amongst themselves. Instead of Bess's sleepwalking adventure, George falls into the water and is almost crushed by a barge, so at least the novel isn't entirely devoid of exciting, traumatic events. And at one point, a car overturns in a river, and a second car crash involves a truck running fully inside of an abandoned building. These two accidents are still a somewhat poor substitute for the train wreck at the beginning of the original novel, but both events are much more exciting than the stalled elevator incident. And there is still a kidnapping and rescue in both the original and revised version of the novel.

  • Diane Walker
    2018-11-18 15:52

    This book was one of my most desired as a child, because it was one of the few Nancy Drew mysteries my library didn't have. Finally someone gave the 1972 revision to me when I was near the end of my ND days. I didn't hate the new one, but it was unmemorable, concerning hidden missionary treasure. "Hidden missionary treasure" could be an intriguing plot device since these are not words usually found together. Unfortunately, it wasn't.The 1935 edition is not unmemorable. It is completely different in setting, tone, and plot. And no wonder! If the 1935 "Hollow Oak" Nancy Drew were a rapper, her name would be "Felonious Nancy D."Spoiler Alert! In the midst of the Depression Nancy wins a radio contest and her prize is a piece of land in Canada . (Was winning land a thing back in the 1930s?) Acting on info from one of lawyer dad Carson Drew's clients, Nancy, Bess and George head up to Canada to check out her prize, thinking there might be valuable mineral rights--gold!--on her land.Nancy meets a mysterious but sad writer, and then the whole lot of them get into a brutal train wreck, impliedly caused by the villains who want Nancy's land. The MBS writer is critically injured, and tells Nancy a story of lost love. This mystery dovetails neatly into Nancy's mission to inspect her land, and a case that Carson is investigating as well. This is not as coincidental as it sounds, because apparently at the time there were 50 people in Canada.When she gets there, there are unscrupulous mining people blasting holes in Nancy's land, and MBS's grandfather has been kidnapped because his land adjoins Nancy's and he was in the way. I expected Carson, who has by this time joined them, to lay an injunction on all the villains, but no, a posse is gathered up, along with the local sheriff. Unfortunately, the sheriff gets angry at Nancy when she is wrong about where to find the kidnap victim, and he and the posse ride off like toddlers with guns and horses. Thus the girls, Carson and their guides have to fend for themselves against bad people in the wild.This is where Nancy, who previously confined herself to helping train wreck victims and lassoing a sleepwalking Bess to prevent her falling, goes rogue. Left without law enforcement and being a certifiable 1935 bad ass, she helps her guide torture a villain; she breaks, enters, and walks off with the bag of gold the unscrupulous mining folk took from her land; and finally, she steals a piece of dynamite from the mining folk and blows up a dam.In other words, she didn't choose the thug life. The thug life chose her. But no lie. Nancy Drew blew up a damn dam. She also reunites the long lost lovers and relatives, and brokers peace among some of the feuding locals. The 1930s books by Mildred Wirt Benson were rewritten to sanitize them. I can easily imagine some 1970s editor wondering what drugs Grosset and Dunlap were doing 40 years before, throwing out the plot, and resetting the whole thing in Illinois.Darker Nancy is interesting. She's more than a little tickled that she might have scored some free gold. She's beginning to throw her weight around as Carson's Drew's daughter. She's fine with torture because she tells herself her guide won't really hurt the villain, who does sing promptly and obligingly. And this isn't dark, but it isn't sweet either: at one point Nancy muses that even now MBS's lover "desired to avoid the entangling fetters of matrimony." Ha!This wasn't my favorite Nancy. I expect it was written to emulate the 1930s movie serial cliffhangers, which were also a little silly. It still amused me mightily. Take that, Bechdel test!

  • Ashley
    2018-12-12 14:44

    OH HOLY SHIT, WHERE TO START.-Nancy wins a radio contest (all she has to do is THINK about something and she wins) and as a reward, she's given the deed to some property in Canada. Her dad thinks it's probably worthless, but Nancy's like YESSSSSS I'M FINALLY INTERNATIONAL. And then IMMEDIATELY some shady characters start harassing her to sell, so of course that's a tip-off.-She runs into a nice old lady with heavy luggage, and then almost immediately lets some shady asshole steal the suitcase (it's never really established why he did that, except to be an asshole?). Nancy feels shitty about it (AS SHE SHOULD, LET'S BE REAL) so she immediately gives chase and recovers the suitcase within like five minutes. (Then Hannah almost lets the asshole steal Nancy's deed to the property because holy shit woman, DON'T GO HANDING OUT DEEDS WILLY-NILLY.)-The nice old lady has a house near Nancy's contest-won land (OF COURSE) so she agrees to chaperone Nancy and the girls to Canada. On the way there the train FUCKING WRECKS, THE FUCKING TRAIN WRECKS, just after Nancy has met poor orphan waif Annette, who wrote the story Nancy titled to win the contest. Annette is pale and tragic and Nancy's like, "Yes, more of this, I love this shit."-After the train wreck, the girls split a hotel room, and Bess, who has NEVER done this before, sleepwalks. She's so nervous about Nancy losing the deed that she fucking THROWS IT ON THE GROUND outside their hotel room, in her sleep. (Why? Because the guy who picks it up will furnish a clue.) Also, Nancy lassoes Bess to keep her from falling to her death, as she learned at Shadow Ranch... a few years ago, she says. So she's about 18-ish now? Maybe?-Anyway, Nancy reunites Annette with both her lost love and her estranged grandfather, helps the lost sweetheart's parents and the chaperone recover some of the money they lost to the villain... and, of course, discovers the titular hollow oak.Assorted badassery:-Nancy hears creepy ghost-ish noises in the cellar of an abandoned house and is like YESSSSSSSSS MYSTERY. She discovers two cats and then a prospector who had been left there for dead!-Another asshole appears and tries to steal Nancy's land, and starts mining it for gold. He offers to buy it for $1,000 (that's about $17,500 now) but Nancy says he can have it for free if he'll just return the guy he kidnapped. Then she STEALS THE GOLD BACK, BITCH, and fucking BLOWS UP THE DAM NEARBY to flood the land so it'll be useless to the thief.Anyway, yeah, total badass.Her souvenir from this one is the gold—she gave up the land—and a picture of the tree. Well, she couldn't bring THAT home.Sadly, no Ned mentions at all. A few times guys look at Nancy with admiration, but she can't spare a second glance at anyone, seriously.

  • Sarah Crawford
    2018-11-20 13:54

    This is a story based on archeological and the history of the Native Americans in the Hopewell area and near that area.Nancy learns about a message in an old oak tree that is supposed to lead to some kind of treasure. She also learns that there is an archeological dig going on in the area where the tree is supposed to be, so she joins the dig and is later joined by George and Bess and Ned and his friends.The problem is that there is some creep named Kit Kadle that wants that message for himself and he's willing to do about anything to stop Nancy from getting to it first. The work at the site uncovers various bones and other Native American artifacts. The story gives a general idea of how a dig is run but leaves out a lot of the more minute procedures that have to be followed.(There also doesn't seem to be a lot of concern on the part of the diggers about the bones they are digging up once belonging to living people and that they are, in essence, robbing the graves of the dead. Granted, the material will be studied and then end up at a museum, but, if I were running the dig, I would have had a Native American shaman from a related tribe performing a cleansing of the area first, at the very least.)The message in the oak tree was left by a missionary who went from village to village. The trees seem to be leaving a directional pattern for Nancy and the others to follow, but creepy KK and his henchmen pop up all the time and show they are really nasty, albeit someone incompetent.It's a good story although it would be interesting to see how it would be modified, if at all, if it was revised with today's sensibilities in mind.

  • Marley Healy
    2018-12-11 18:36

    I'm not sure where my bewilderment starts and irritation ends. As an archaeologist, the piss-poor conditions of the dig site and complete incompetence of the woman in charge was astounding to me. No method, no security, no rules! I understand that this is a) fiction b) a Nancy Drew story, but Carolyn Keehn was generally well researched. Also, the stupid love triangle? Puh-leez. Nancy has a habit of neglecting to mention her boyfriend Ned to the flock of interchangeable male stand-ins that seem to fall in love with her at first meeting. Certainly she should be able to meet one guy who isn't bewitched by her Titian hair and pants suits? I strongly got the sense though that she led this particular guy on, what with the constant motorcycle rides to pick up her mail, and he was absolutely entitled to feel bummed out that she had a boyfriend. Also, why did it get her panties in such a twist that he was jealous of Ned? Who cares?! You're Nancy Drew! The thought of this dude longing for her while she was not interested absolutely ruined her mental health, and for whatever reason she (and Bess!) felt compelled to try and play match maker in her guilt. Fucking ridick.The other sore thumb that stuck out to me was the bitchy girl at the dig site. Why was she so mean to Nancy? Sometimes there will be a snobby girl at a country club who exists solely to highlight the many virtues of Nancy and ends up being involved in whatever stupid hijinx are going on, but this girl was totally rude for no reason. Overall, not one of my favorites.

  • Casey Lawrence
    2018-12-04 18:42

    Read both the original and re-written version of this book for a course on children's literature. The original, 1937 Message in the Hollow Oak was a romance story set in Canada; Nancy wins some property in a contest, and on her way to survey it (hoping to find gold) she gets involved in an exciting adventure that includes a train derailment, being shot at, several kidnappings, and blowing up a dam with dynamite, all to stop some crooks from taking what is hers (while reuniting some long-lost lovers, of course)! The re-write also involves various characters being kidnapped, but instead of Canada Nancy finds herself in Illinois, assisting an archaeological dig (disturbing the remains of an unnamed "Indian" tribe which is problematic in itself) and solving a four-hundred-year-old mystery that some professionals just couldn't figure out. The original is exciting, delightfully far-fetched, and, well, *original*, whereas the re-write seems formulaic and predictable. Nancy of the 1950s is far less independent and far more boy-crazy (and has men falling at her feet, begging for her attention at every turn). In the end, there is no comparison: if you want the real Nancy Drew, plucky sixteen-year-old girl detective who's not afraid of getting her hands dirty, get your hands on the original stories. The re-writes are an embarrassing mockery of the girl we know and love.

  • Phe
    2018-12-02 15:33

    The Message in the Hollow Oak is a children's story by Carolyn Keene (pseudonym) and the 12th book in the Nancy Drew series.Nancy Drew travels to Illinois to track down an ancient treasure, but when she receives threats and a friend is kidnapped, Nancy realizes that her life is in danger.I’ve always been a voracious reader. So, as a child, one of my favorite things about summer was the frequent trips to our local library, which was less than a mile from our house. Like most young girls of a certain age (ahem), my love for mysteries started with Nancy Drew—there simply was no mystery too baffling that she couldn’t solve. And as I would read her most current adventure, I would imagine myself following in her footsteps … taking charge and plunging ahead, getting into mischief, chasing down culprits and solving the mystery. Even though I haven’t re-read any of these books since I was a child, I still think that Nancy is a great character—her courage, confidence and fierce independence, makes her an iconic source of inspiration for young girls everywhere. A must-read children's book, The Message in the Hollow Oak is another wonderful Nancy Drew mystery.

  • Tabi34
    2018-12-04 16:55

    Another fun read. Nancy Drew, girl genius, is asked to solve the mystery of the message in the hollow oak by a member of the New York detective's club, when they were unable too. The book is full of dated material beginning with an archaeological dig of the Indian burial grounds in southern Illinois. Of course disturbing an ancient burial ground is taboo these days. People are kidnapped, but never harmed. The worst is they aren't fed regularly, for shame. A bit of jealousy arises when another boy becomes interested in Nancy before Ned shows up, but never fear everything will be just hunky dory and another girl is found and introduced to the would-be suitor so Ned won't have to come to blows with the fella. I kept expecting them all to break out in the songs from Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma" but that wasn't even written when this book went into publication. But the diggers sit around after supper and sing. Oh for happier, simpler times. It is always fun to re-read these timeless if somewhat dated books.